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PolitiFact Florida | Tampa Bay Times
Sorting out the truth in state politics

PolitiFact Florida: In 1960, C.W. Bill Young was sole GOP member of state Senate

C.W. Bill Young, left, was sworn in as a member of the Florida Senate with Henry Sayler and Wilbur Boyd in November 1966. By then, Young was no longer the sole Republican.

Times files (1966) 

C.W. Bill Young, left, was sworn in as a member of the Florida Senate with Henry Sayler and Wilbur Boyd in November 1966. By then, Young was no longer the sole Republican.

U.S. Rep. C.W. Bill Young's announcement that he will not seek re-election in 2014 set off tributes from Florida politicos to the Pinellas County Republican's five decades in public office.

One tweet about Young's early years caught our eye.

"Many don't know that Bill Young was once the minority leader in the Florida Senate," tweeted Chris Latvala, a Republican running for the Florida House and son of Sen. Jack Latvala, "because he was the only Republican senator."

It's an interesting claim, if for no other reason than the state Senate for the past decade has been dominated by Republicans.

We did not have to go far to confirm Latvala's tweet. All it took was a trip to the Tampa Bay Times library, which keeps records on local candidates and officials and state handbooks.

Young identified himself as the minority leader of the Florida Senate in an undated questionnaire that includes this key line: "In 1960, at age 29, elected as the youngest senator and the only Republican senator in Florida."

Young was elected to the Democrat-controlled Senate in 1960 and was the sole Republican member. He was re-elected in subsequent years, serving through 1970 when he won his first congressional election.

In a sign of how powerful Democrats were at the time, the 1961-62 Senate roster does not list political party affiliation. We confirmed the party affiliation of senators by combing through the State Library and Archives of Florida.

It's also not clear Young had the official title of minority leader — the records we found were silent on the point — but he offered the lone voice of party dissent as the only GOP senator until 1963.

Young's election to the Senate set into motion a GOP resurgence in that chamber, said Curt Kiser, a lawyer-lobbyist who represented Pinellas County in the state House in 1972 and the Senate in 1984.

"He was the minority leader because he was the only one," Kiser said. "That was the beginning of the modern history of the Republican Party."

Young gained more GOP company as the 1960s rolled on, starting with Warren Henderson of Venice in 1963. By 1967, 20 Republicans served in the Senate. (The Senate back then had 48 members; today it has 40.) The increase reflected Florida's evolving demographics, with conservative Democrats in the northern part of the state switching parties and new residents moving from conservative states casting votes for GOP candidates and running for office themselves.

Democrats remained in control of the Senate until Republicans took over in 1994.

Latvala's tweet is accurate. We rate it True.

Read more fact-checks at PolitiFact.com/Florida.

The statement

"Many don't know that Bill Young was once the minority leader in the Florida Senate … because he was the only Republican senator."

Florida House candidate Chris Latvala, in a tweet

The ruling

PolitiFact ruling: True
In 1960, and at age 29, C.W. Bill Young was elected to the Florida Senate, where he was the only Republican until 1963. Young was a member of the Senate until he won his first election to Congress in 1970. We rate Latvala's claim True.

PolitiFact Florida: In 1960, C.W. Bill Young was sole GOP member of state Senate 10/13/13 [Last modified: Sunday, October 13, 2013 9:38pm]
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