Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

President Trump makes puzzling claim about Andrew Jackson and the Civil War

NEW YORK — President Donald Trump made puzzling claims about Andrew Jackson and the Civil War in an interview, suggesting he was uncertain about the origin of the conflict while claiming that Jackson was upset about a war that started 16 years after his death.

Trump, who has at times shown a shaky grasp of U.S. history, said he wonders why issues "could not have been worked out" in order to prevent the secession of 11 Southern states and a war that lasted four years and killed more than 600,000 soldiers.

"People don't realize, you know, the Civil War, if you think about it, why?" Trump said in an interview with The Washington Examiner, according to a transcript released Monday. "People don't ask that question, but why was there the Civil War? Why could that one not have been worked out?"

Trump ruminated after lauding Jackson, the populist president whom he and his staff have cited as a role model. He suggested that if Jackson had been president "a little later, you wouldn't have had the Civil War."

"He was really angry that he saw what was happening with regard to the Civil War. He said, 'There's no reason for this,'" Trump continued.

But Jackson died in 1845, and the Civil War didn't begin until 16 years later, in 1861.

Jackson was a slave-holding plantation owner. Some historians do credit him with preserving the union when South Carolina threatened to secede in the 1830s over an individual state's ability to void federal tariffs. That controversy, though, was not about slavery, and the eventual compromise that preserved states' rights is viewed as a milestone on the way to the Civil War.

The Civil War was decades in the making, stemming from disputes between the North and South about slavery and whether the union or states themselves had more power. The question over the expansion of slavery into new western territories simmered for decades and Southern leaders threatened secession if anti-slavery candidate Abraham Lincoln was elected in 1860.

After Lincoln won without carrying a single Southern state, Southern leaders believed their rights were imperiled and seceded, forming the Confederate States of America. War erupted soon afterward as the North fought to keep the nation together.

The White House did not immediately respond to a request for an explanation of Trump's reasoning.

Trump, during an African-American history month event, seemed to imply that the 19th century abolitionist Frederick Douglass was still alive. Trump said in February that Douglass "is an example of somebody who's done an amazing job and is getting recognized more and more, I notice."

While justifying the need for a southern border wall, Trump said last week that human trafficking is "a problem that's probably worse than any time in the history of this world," a claim that seemed to omit the African slave trade.

TRUMP'S QUOTES ABOUT ANDREW JACKSON AND THE CIVIL WAR

Speaking to the Washington Examiner reporter Salena Zito last week, President Trump made some puzzling claims about President Andrew Jackson, who died 16 years before the outbreak of the Civil War. The interview was set to air Monday on "Main Street Meets the Beltway" on Sirius XM radio, which posted an excerpt on Twitter. The exchange:

TRUMP: They said my campaign is most like, my campaign and win was most like Andrew Jackson with his campaign. And I said, "When was Andrew Jackson?" It was 1828. That's a long time ago. That's Andrew Jackson. And he had a very, very mean and nasty campaign. Because they said this was the meanest and the nastiest. And unfortunately it continues.

ZITO: His wife died.

TRUMP: His wife died. They destroyed his wife and she died. And, you know, he was a swashbuckler. But when his wife died, you know, he visited her grave every day. I visited her grave actually, because I was in Tennessee.

ZITO: Oh, that's right, you were in Tennessee.

TRUMP: And it was amazing. The people of Tennessee are amazing people. Well, they love Andrew Jackson. They love Andrew Jackson in Tennessee.

ZITO: Yeah, he's a fascinating —

TRUMP: I mean, had Andrew Jackson been a little later, you wouldn't have had the Civil War. He was a very tough person, but he had a big heart, and he was really angry that he saw what was happening with regard to the Civil War. He said, "There's no reason for this." People don't realize, you know, the Civil War, you think about it, why?

ZITO: Yeah —

TRUMP: People don't ask that question. But why was there the Civil War? Why could that one not have been worked out?

President Trump makes puzzling claim about Andrew Jackson and the Civil War 05/01/17 [Last modified: Monday, May 1, 2017 3:57pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Lightning edges Red Wings on road

    Lightning Strikes

    DETROIT — The digs were different, the Lightning seeing the masterfully-done new Little Caesar's Arena for the first time.

    Lightning center/Red Wings’ killer Tyler Johnson gets past defenseman Trevor Daley on his way to the first goal of the game.
  2. Armwood pulls away to defeat Plant 27-7, remain undefeated

    Footballpreps

    SEFFNER — First-year Armwood coach Evan Davis pulled out all the stops to get his team psyched for Monday's annual grudge match against Plant.

    Armwood defensive end Malcolm Lamar (97) gets fired up before the start of the game between Plant High School Panthers and the Armwood High School Hawks in Suffer, Fla. on Monday, Oct. 16, 2017.
  3. Clearwater police: Car thief dead after owner fires gun

    Crime

    CLEARWATER — One man is dead after the owner of a car fired shots at the thieves who were stealing it Monday night, police said.

  4. Iraqi forces sweep into Kirkuk, checking Kurdish independence drive

    World

    KIRKUK, Iraq — After weeks of threats and posturing, the Iraqi government began a military assault Monday to curb the independence drive by the nation's Kurdish minority, wresting oil fields and a contested city from separatists pushing to break away from Iraq.

    Iraqi security forces patrol Monday in Tuz Khormato, about 45 miles south of Kirkuk, a disputed city that the government seized in response to last month’s Kurdish vote for independence.
  5. Trump and McConnell strive for unity amid rising tensions

    National

    WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump and Sen. Mitch McConnell, the Republican leader, tried to convey a sense of harmony Monday after months of private feuding that threatened to undermine their party's legislative push in the coming weeks to enact a sweeping tax cut.

    President Donald Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell field questions Monday in the Rose Garden of the White House. “We have been friends for a long time,” Trump said.