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Obama cites gains in health coverage during Milwaukee visit (w/video)

MILWAUKEE — President Barack Obama trumpeted the nation's declining uninsured rate Thursday and said 20 million people have gained insurance as a result of his signature health care law as he commemorated the approaching sixth anniversary of the Affordable Care Act.

Obama criticized Republicans for trying to "repeal or undermine" the act about 60 times and said they've explained what they would replace it with "about zero times."

"If they got their way, 20 million people will have their insurance taken away from them," Obama said.

Congratulating local leaders in Wisconsin for winning a national health insurance enrollment contest, Obama acknowledged that millions more are eligible to enroll, but have yet to do so. He attributed some of that to acrimony over the law, saying people haven't always known what's true and what's not.

Obama was introduced at the event by Brent Brown of Mosinee, Wis., who said he's a Republican who never voted to elect Obama and worked to ensure he would not be president. But he said the health care law saved his life after he was diagnosed with an autoimmune disease and ran out of money for treatment.

Brown called on Republicans to quit trying to repeal the law. "Swallow your pride as I am doing right now," he said.

More than 38,000 Milwaukee-area residents have newly signed up for health coverage, out of about 51,000 uninsured people who were eligible to enroll. The city's signup ratio was the highest among the 20 cities competing in the president's "Healthy Communities Challenge." The winning city was promised a visit by the president.

"All told, counting new folks and people renewing their coverage, you got nearly 90,000 people to sign up," Obama said. "That's enough to fill Lambeau Field and still have a big tailgating party with folks outside. And those tailgaters wouldn't have to worry because Obamacare covers indigestion from too many brats." Lambeau Field is the home of the NFL's Green Bay Packers.

Obama also faulted Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker for refusing federal funding to expand Medicaid, an option given to states under the law, to help cover more people. Obama said 21,000 additional state residents would be covered "with the stroke of his pen."

"He's denying Wisconsinites their ticket to health insurance and it's political," Obama said of Walker, who dropped out of the race for the Republican presidential nomination last year. Walker has argued that the federal government can't be trusted to keep its funding commitment to the states.

For the first time, more than nine of 10 Americans have health insurance. And the number of uninsured has dropped from about 44.8 million in 2013, the year before the health care law's big coverage expansion, to about 28.8 million, according to the latest estimates.

An improving economy has also helped boost coverage, analysts say.

Still, polling continues to show that slightly more Americans view the law unfavorably than favorably. And repealing the law has been a mantra of Republicans running for federal office as critics argue that the law's mandates have increased coverage costs unnecessarily.

Obama is using his final year to visit communities he says have benefited from his presidency. He hailed the auto industry's rebound during a recent trip to Detroit and last week touted the economic stimulus bill on a visit to Florida. Obama signed the Affordable Care Act into law on March 23, 2010.

Daughter will keep president in D.C.

WASHINGTON — Republicans hoping to be rid of President Barack Obama early next year will be disappointed when they hear what he told a lunch companion in Milwaukee. Obama said he'll stick around the Washington area for a couple of years after he leaves office in January so daughter Sasha can finish high school. Sasha, 14, is a freshman at Sidwell Friends, an exclusive school in the nation's capital that for years has educated the children of Washington's elites. Her sister, Malia, 17, is a senior at Sidwell. She is expected to be settling in at college when her father's term ends. Obama is also expected to spend time in Chicago after leaving the White House. He and his wife, Michelle, have kept their home in the city. Obama also plans to build his presidential library in Chicago.

Associated Press

Obama cites gains in health coverage during Milwaukee visit (w/video) 03/03/16 [Last modified: Thursday, March 3, 2016 9:31pm]
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