Tuesday, January 23, 2018
Politics

Obama signs expanded Violence Against Women Act

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama signed expanded protections for domestic violence victims into law Thursday, renewing a measure credited with curbing attacks against women a year and a half after it lapsed amid partisan bickering.

The revitalized Violence Against Women Act also marked an important win for gay rights advocates and American Indians, who will see new protections under the law, and for Obama, whose attempts to push for a renewal failed last year after they became entangled in gender politics and the presidential election.

"This is your day. This is the day of the advocates, the day of the survivors. This is your victory," Obama said. "This victory shows that when the American people make their voices heard, Washington listens."

As Obama prepared to put his pen to the law, new government data underscored both progress and an enduring need to do more.

The rate of sexual violence against women and girls 12 or older fell 64 percent in a decade and has remained stable for five years, the Justice Department said in a survey released Thursday. In 2010, women and girls nationwide experienced about 270,000 rapes or sexual assaults, compared with 556,000 in 1995.

The survey also showed that rapes and sexual assault rates involving women have plateaued while violent crime rates overall have declined. Women's advocacy groups called the report proof that the Violence Against Women Act and heightened awareness of the problem by police have had a positive effect.

Still, 1 in 5 women will be raped during their lifetime, said Obama, asserting a continued need for action nearly two decades after the bill's original passage in 1994.

"It didn't just change the rules, it changed our culture. It empowered people to start speaking out," Obama said.

The law authorizes some $659 million a year over five years for programs to strengthen the criminal justice system's response to crimes against women and some men. One element of this year's renewal focuses on reducing sexual assault on college campuses.

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