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Florida will again consider mandatory recess

Kid's Community College students make their way onto a basketball court for recess May 11, 2016, in Riverview. Just over 300 students, grades K-5 attend the charter school. The school recently applied to add middle school grades. (CHRIS URSO   |   Times)

Kid's Community College students make their way onto a basketball court for recess May 11, 2016, in Riverview. Just over 300 students, grades K-5 attend the charter school. The school recently applied to add middle school grades. (CHRIS URSO | Times)

TALLAHASSEE — A popular, parent-backed proposal to require daily recess at all of Florida's public elementary schools will be back before the Florida Legislature next spring.

Sen. Anitere Flores, R-Miami, filed a bill Tuesday that mirrors one that died in the spring — despite fervent support — when then-education policy chairman John Legg, R-Trinity, refused to hear it in committee.

The measure, SB 78 for the 2017 session, mandates local school boards offer 20 minutes per day of "supervised, safe and unstructured free-play recess" for students in kindergarten through fifth grade.

Orlando Republican Rep. Rene Plasencia, who led the effort last year, will again champion it in the House. He said he's in the process of drafting his bill for 2017 and plans to file it soon.

Last session's proposal was initiated by passionate parents from all across Florida — primarily self-described "recess moms" — who pleaded and lobbied for lawmakers' support in the 2016 session.

Some school districts in Florida already offer forms of recess, but some parents argue district policies don't go far enough or aren't always followed. They want a uniform standard statewide, citing the physical and mental benefits children gain from having time to simply play with other kids on the playground, which also affords them a break from increasingly rigorous study in the classroom.

A bill mandating daily recess overwhelmingly passed the House last spring, but it stalled in the Senate when then-Sen. Legg wouldn't take it up. He said repeatedly it was a "local issue" that county school boards, not the Legislature, should decide.

Other senators disagreed with Legg's firm position to not even consider the bill, but late-session efforts by one senator to bypass him weren't successful. Legg decided not to seek re-election after Senate districts were redrawn.

Locally, school boards might have a challenge in finding time for recess in an already jam-packed school day.

"I think one of the things that this will allow us to do is to have a conversation as to, what does this average typical day of a student look like? Maybe there are some state-mandated issues that we need to re-evaluate," Flores said. "I do think there's time for this and I think when you speak anecdotally with teachers, they'll tell you there is time for this. The proof is in the fact that several schools and districts already do it."

She added: "Ideally you wouldn't need a piece of legislation for this but we're obviously at a point where school districts say they don't have time or are using not having time as a crutch. We need to make this work."

In the House, the only two to oppose the recess bill last session are now in key positions of power, where they can determine the fate of the measure next spring: Speaker Richard Corcoran, R-Land O'Lakes, and Miami Republican Rep. Michael Bileca, who will be chairman of the Education Committee.

But Plasencia said he's "not concerned" and doesn't foresee any problems.

"We had advocates reach out to the speaker over the summer; I don't want to speak for him, but he seemed very favorable to it," Plasencia said.

Contact Kristen M. Clark at kclark@miamiherald.com. Follow @ByKristenMClark.

Florida will again consider mandatory recess 11/30/16 [Last modified: Wednesday, November 30, 2016 2:36pm]
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