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Pastors, seniors, unions protest against revenue-capping Amendment 3

TALLAHASSEE — Florida religious leaders, labor unions and senior citizens marched to the state Capitol on Monday to protest a proposed constitutional amendment they say will lead to massive cuts to education and crucial social services.

Calling the Florida Legislature's revenue-capping Amendment 3 a "wolf in sheep's clothing," the group of about 50 said the proposal would slash education funding and pit seniors against the poor in a scramble for limited state dollars.

"This will not be good for the great citizens of the state of Florida," said the Rev. Richard Dunn, a Miami pastor. "It will not be good for our children, it will not be good for our seniors and it will not be good for the middle-class people."

Amendment 3 proposes to change the way state revenue caps are set, using a formula based on population size and inflation, rather than personal income growth. Once state revenue from taxes and other sources exceeds the new caps, excess money would be used to shore up a budget stabilization "rainy day" fund.

Proponents of Amendment 3 — which is backed by business groups — say it will force state lawmakers to spend more wisely and avoid overspending during times of economic growth.

"The less government takes, the more Floridians will keep," said Edie Ousley, a spokesperson for the Florida Chamber of Commerce. "Voting yes on Amendment 3 will send a message to our state leaders that the size of Florida's government shouldn't grow faster than the taxpayers' capacity to pay for it."

But opponents — who have begun to mobilize in religious groups, labor unions and senior communities — predict a much grimmer scenario.

Two speakers at Monday's rally bluntly stated that Amendment 3 would be "deadly." Fliers used by the "No On 3" campaign show a menacing wolf in a sheep costume lurking among a flock of unsuspecting sheep.

A similar proposal was approved in Colorado in 1992, but was later suspended by voters in that state. Voters in several other states have rejected similar proposals, the Orlando-based No On 3 campaign said.

Other speakers claimed that voters should reject all 11 constitutional amendments on this year's lengthy ballot, which features several controversial proposals on issues like abortion, property taxes and state funding for religious institutions.

To be added to the state Constitution, amendments require approval from 60 percent of voters.

Leon County Supervisor of Elections Ion Sancho told the group of protesters that all of this year's amendments represent "political issues placed on the ballot for political purposes."

"Since 1968, when we amended the Constitution, this is the first general election in which all of these constitutional amendments have been placed here by the Florida Legislature, not by citizens," said Sancho, who was joined at the rally by representatives from the AARP, Florida Alliance for Retired Americans and PICO United Florida, a network of 60 congregations.

Your guide to the amendments

A closer look at the 11 proposed changes to the Florida Constitution is at tampabay.com/amendments.

Pastors, seniors, unions protest against revenue-capping Amendment 3 10/01/12 [Last modified: Monday, October 1, 2012 10:01pm]
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