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2159554 2038-01-18 05:00:00.0 UTC 2038-01-18T00:00:00.000-05:00 2014-01-03 21:58:23.0 UTC 2014-01-03T16:58:23.000-05:00 punditfact-donna-brazile-says-the-farm-bill-would-reduce-the-deficit published 2014-01-03 21:56:31.0 UTC 2014-01-03T16:56:31.000-05:00 news/politics/stateroundup DTI 115808633 The statement "(The farm bill) has a provision that would in many ways reduce the deficit." Donna Brazile, Dec. 29, on CNN's State of the Union The ruling Don't let the name of the bill fool you: The farm bill, which must be renewed every five years, touches many corners of American agricultural policy. It provides billions of dollars to some farmers in crop subsidies and also funds the country's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, better known as food stamps. The package proposed in 2013 comes with a big price tag. The Senate passed a version in June that would spend $955 billion from 2014 to 2023. The House passed its farm bill in two different pieces of legislation totaling $921 billion over a decade. There are vast differences between the bills, particularly with SNAP policy, but they do have one thing in common: Each would reduce the deficit, according to the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office. It's the job of the CBO to estimate the cost of legislation so policymakers know the implications of their votes. For bills like the farm bill, CBO analysts use accepted economic forecasting methods to essentially make their best guess about how programs will affect the budget under existing law. The office projected the costs of each chamber's farm bills since spring 2013, with new estimates coming later to account for amendments and other money-related changes tacked on during the lawmaking process. To give a big picture, the analysts make some assumptions about future policy. Their estimates for the farm bills, for example, assume that programs set to expire would be reauthorized without major changes in 2018 through 2023. Let's start with CBO's "baseline." The office assumed that if the programs in the farm bill continued in their current form over the next decade, it would cost $973 billion. In its May analysis, the CBO found the Senate bill would reduce that total by $17.9 billion through 2023. In other words, it would have net-deficit reduction of almost $18 billion. The pair of House bills would go further, the CBO found, reducing the deficit by a total of $51.9 billion. The House would cut about 10 times more in the food stamps program than the Senate. Both bills rack up savings by cutting back on crop subsidy and conservation programs, including eliminating direct payments to farmers regardless of whether they are currently farming their land. That program costs about $5 billion a year and was conceived in 1996 as a temporary solution. Our ruling Brazile said the farm bill "has a provision that would in many ways reduce the deficit." Her comment is based on estimates of the House and Senate bills by the Congressional Budget Office, which found both bills to be deficit reducers in the long term. Over 10 years, the proposal would shrink the deficit by $20 billion or so — a paltry sum in the universe of federal spending. But, yes, technically a deficit reducer. Brazile is right, but her comments might lead someone to more sweeping conclusions. As such, we rate this claim Mostly True. KATIE SANDERS, Times staff writer Edited for print. Read the full version at PunditFact.com. By Katie Sanders, Times Staff Writer News, Politics, State Roundup, top business PunditFact: Donna Brazile says the farm bill would reduce the deficit ASHAROCKMANN 4STD Main Farm bills reduce deficit over time, but amount is minimal <style>img.kick-pf {width: 25%; display:inline-block;}</style><p></p><a href="http://www.politifact.com/punditfact/"><img class="kick-pf" src="http://static.politifact.com.s3.amazonaws.com/editions/punditfact/Pundit_logo.png"></a> 2 pfa_farmbill010514 Farm bills reduce deficit over time, but amount is minimal 2014-01-05 05:00:00.0 UTC 2014-01-05T00:00:00.000-05:00 1 /resources/images/dti/2014/01/pfa_farmbill010514_12192803.jpg /resources/images/dti/rendered/2014/01/pfa_farmbill010514_12192803_4col.jpg/resources/images/dti/rendered/2014/01/pfa_farmbill010514_12192803_8col.jpg true templatedata/tampabaytimes/StaffArticle/data/2014/01/03/115808633-punditfact-donna-brazile-says-the-farm-bill-would-reduce-the-deficit StaffArticle news,politicsPoliticsnews,politics,state roundupState Political RoundupThe statement"(The farm bill) has a provision that would in many ways reduce the deficit."News, Politics, State Roundup, top businessNews, Politics, State Roundup, top businessKatie Sanders 1068022 2038-01-18 05:00:00.0 UTC 2038-01-18T00:00:00.000-05:00 2012-10-25 12:54:18.0 UTC 2012-10-25T08:54:18.000-04:00 katie-sanders published Katie Sanders <p>Katie Sanders is deputy editor of <a href="http://www.politifact.com/">PolitiFact</a>, the nonpartisan website founded by the <i>Tampa Bay Times</i> to fact-check politicians and public leaders. Read stories she edits and writes <a href="http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/staff/katie-sanders/">here.</a></p><p>Before moving into that role, she was a staff writer for <a href="http://www.politifact.com/punditfact/">PunditFact</a> , a website created by the <i>Tampa Bay Times</i> and Poynter Institute to fact-check talking heads.</p><p>She previously reported on state politics and government for <a href="http://www.politifact.com/florida/">PolitiFact Florida</a> from the <i>Tampa Bay Times/Miami Herald</i> Tallahassee bureau and on breaking news for the <i>Times</i> in St. Petersburg.</p><p>Before joining the <i>Times</i>, she interned at <i>The St. Augustine Record</i> and <i>National Journal's CongressDaily </i>in Washington, D.C.</p><p>She earned bachelor's degrees in journalism and English from the University of Florida. She lives in St. Petersburg with T.J., her husband, and Minnow, their dog.</p> PolitiFact Deputy Editor writers DTI 58932140 Katie Sanders is deputy editor of PolitiFact, the nonpartisan website founded by the Tampa Bay Times to fact-check politicians and public leaders. Read stories she edits and writes here. Before moving into that role, she was a staff writer for PunditFact , a website created by the Tampa Bay Times and Poynter Institute to fact-check talking heads. She previously reported on state politics and government for PolitiFact Florida from the Tampa Bay Times/Miami Herald Tallahassee bureau and on breaking news for the Times in St. Petersburg. Before joining the Times, she interned at The St. Augustine Record and National Journal's CongressDaily in Washington, D.C. She earned bachelor's degrees in journalism and English from the University of Florida. She lives in St. Petersburg with T.J., her husband, and Minnow, their dog. <p>Phone: (727) 893-8037</p><p>Email: <a href="mailto:ksanders@tampabay.com">ksanders@tampabay.com</a></p><p>Twitter: <a href="http://twitter.com/katielsanders">@KatieLSanders</a></p><p>Blog: <a href="http://blogs.tampabay.com/blogs/divas">Deal Divas</a></p><p>Website: <a href="http://www.politifact.com/">PolitiFact</a><br /><br /></p> 1 Katie Sanders new sig mug. [EVE EDELHEIT | Times] /resources/images/dti/2016/04/500434654_17090306.jpg true templatedata/tampabaytimes/AuthorProfile/data/58932140-katie-sanders AuthorProfile 2012-10-25 12:54:18.0 UTC 2012-10-25T08:54:18.000-04:00 <span style="display:none;" class="author vcard"><span class="fn">KATIE SANDERS</span></span><span style="display:none;" class="source-org vcard"><span class="org fn">Tampa Bay Times</span></span><a rel="item-license" href="/universal/user_agreement.shtml">&#169; 2016 Tampa Bay Times</a><br /><br />Times Staff Writer 2261695 2016-01-18 02:11:49.0 UTC 7 Months Ago politifact-florida-jeb-bush-says-he-helped-reduce-youth-heroin-use-as news/politics PolitiFact Florida: Jeb Bush says he helped reduce youth heroin use as governor StaffArticle 2265739 2016-02-17 18:36:36.0 UTC 6 Months Ago bill-to-reduce-number-of-suspended-driver-licenses-in-florida-picks-up news/politics/stateroundup Bill to reduce number of suspended drivers' licenses in Florida picks up speed StaffArticle 2280078 2016-06-02 21:36:39.0 UTC 3 Months Ago trump-as-president-would-endanger-america-clinton-says news/politics/elections Trump as president would endanger America, Clinton says StaffArticle <p><b>The statement</b></p> <p>&quot;(The farm bill) has a provision that would in many ways reduce the deficit.&quot;</p> <p><b>Donna Brazile,</b> Dec. 29, on CNN's State of the Union</p> <p><b>The ruling</b></p> <p>Don't let the name of the bill fool you: The farm bill, which must be renewed every five years, touches many corners of American agricultural policy. It provides billions of dollars to some farmers in crop subsidies and also funds the country's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, better known as food stamps.</p> <p>The package proposed in 2013 comes with a big price tag. The Senate passed a version in June that would spend $955 billion from 2014 to 2023. The House passed its farm bill in two different pieces of legislation totaling $921 billion over a decade.</p> <p>There are vast differences between the bills, particularly with SNAP policy, but they do have one thing in common: Each would reduce the deficit, according to the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office.</p> <p>It's the job of the CBO to estimate the cost of legislation so policymakers know the implications of their votes. For bills like the farm bill, CBO analysts use accepted economic forecasting methods to essentially make their best guess about how programs will affect the budget under existing law.</p> <p>The office projected the costs of each chamber's farm bills since spring 2013, with new estimates coming later to account for amendments and other money-related changes tacked on during the lawmaking process. To give a big picture, the analysts make some assumptions about future policy. Their estimates for the farm bills, for example, assume that programs set to expire would be reauthorized without major changes in 2018 through 2023.</p> <p>Let's start with CBO's &quot;baseline.&quot; The office assumed that if the programs in the farm bill continued in their current form over the next decade, it would cost $973 billion.</p> <p>In its May analysis, the CBO found the Senate bill would reduce that total by $17.9 billion through 2023. In other words, it would have net-deficit reduction of almost $18 billion. The pair of House bills would go further, the CBO found, reducing the deficit by a total of $51.9 billion. The House would cut about 10 times more in the food stamps program than the Senate.</p> <p>Both bills rack up savings by cutting back on crop subsidy and conservation programs, including eliminating direct payments to farmers regardless of whether they are currently farming their land. That program costs about $5 billion a year and was conceived in 1996 as a temporary solution.</p> <p><b>Our ruling</b></p> <p>Brazile said the farm bill &quot;has a provision that would in many ways reduce the deficit.&quot; Her comment is based on estimates of the House and Senate bills by the Congressional Budget Office, which found both bills to be deficit reducers in the long term.</p> <p>Over 10 years, the proposal would shrink the deficit by $20&nbsp;billion or so — a paltry sum in the universe of federal spending. But, yes, technically a deficit reducer.</p> <p>Brazile is right, but her comments might lead someone to more sweeping conclusions. As such, we rate this claim Mostly True.</p> <p></p> <p><b>KATIE SANDERS,</b> <i>Times staff writer</i></p> <p><i>Edited for print. Read the full version at PunditFact.com.</i></p>trueruntime2016-08-30 05:51:30