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5 students are arrested in fight at Dunedin High School

DUNEDIN — Five students were arrested and a teacher was slightly injured Thursday during a fight at Dunedin High School.

Jonathan Harris, 17, of Clearwater was charged with felony battery on a School Board employee and misdemeanor disorderly conduct.

The Pinellas County Sheriff's Office, which responded to the fight shortly after noon, did not release the names of the other juveniles who were arrested because they were each charged with disorderly conduct, a misdemeanor. All the students were taken to the Pinellas Juvenile Assessment Center.

The fight, which started as the result of an ongoing dispute between two boys, ages 16 and 17, began outside the school gymnasium, then moved to the bus circle, according to the Sheriff's Office.

That's when Harris and two girls, ages 14 and 16, entered the fray, authorities said.

Several school employees saw the fight break out and contacted the school resource officer, who came to the scene and radioed for additional deputies.

"I'm told they were able to bring it under control within a few minutes," said Sheriff's Office spokeswoman Cecilia Barreda.

During the melee, Harris hit teacher Dr. John Eberts, who was trying to break up the fight, the Sheriff's Office said. Eberts, who was hit in the face, was treated by paramedics from the Dunedin Fire Department, then taken to Mease Dunedin Hospital to be treated for minor injuries.

Eberts is a social studies teacher, the school Web site said.

Dunedin High School is at 1651 Pinehurst Road.

Rita Farlow can be reached at farlow@sptimes.com or (727) 445-4157.

5 students are arrested in fight at Dunedin High School 01/21/10 [Last modified: Thursday, January 21, 2010 8:02pm]
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