Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Man, 33, shot and killed at his Tarpon Springs home

Investigators comb around the house where a man died late Sunday after being shot multiple times by an unknown assailant.

JIM DAMASKE | Times

Investigators comb around the house where a man died late Sunday after being shot multiple times by an unknown assailant.

TARPON SPRINGS — When Gerry Baden's wife heard a crackle after the Super Bowl late Sunday, she thought it was fireworks. Baden thought it sounded more like someone banging on garage doors in their quiet, gated subdivision off Alt. U.S. 19.

Within minutes, they got a call from another resident at the Anclote Point Townhomes. There was a body on the ground in front of 1197 Flying Fish Lane.

"We couldn't believe it," Baden said.

A 33-year-old man had collapsed against his garage door. He died late Sunday after being shot multiple times by an unknown assailant, police said.

The garage door was still marred by blood spatters Monday evening. Detectives were withholding the victim's identity until they notified his relatives.

Baden said he knew the victim and that he was a local martial arts instructor. "His business wasn't doing as well as he would like," Baden said. "But he was trying to make ends meet."

"We do not feel any other citizens are in danger," said Tarpon Springs police Capt. Jeffrey Young.

Police also don't think there's any link between this death and the murder of an elderly Tarpon Springs couple last month on Chesapeake Drive, Young said. Police say that couple suffered trauma to their upper bodies, but investigators have not named a suspect or said exactly how the couple was killed.

Some residents of Anclote Point were surprised that something like this could happen in their secluded, waterfront community where streets have names like Coquina Drive and Starfish Lane.

"It's usually nice and quiet and peaceful," said Gene Zeh, 72, who lives around the corner from the victim in another pastel-colored three-story home.

"Nobody even knows we're here," said Baden, 64, who is the homeowners association president. Most residents, he said, are around his age or older and have pretty mellow lifestyles.

"We live here because it's crime-free."

Times researcher Carolyn Edds and Times Staff Writer Demorris Lee contributed to this report. Lorri Helfand can be reached at [email protected] or (727) 445-4155.

Man, 33, shot and killed at his Tarpon Springs home 02/07/11 [Last modified: Monday, February 7, 2011 10:10pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Tampa Bay small businesses give Tampa B+ for regulatory climate

    Corporate

    In a recent survey about small business sentiments toward state and local government policies that affect them, Tampa Bay ranked at No. 25 out of 80 — a B+ overall.

    Tampa Bay ranked No. 25 out of 80 in a recent survey about how small business owners feel about state and local government policies that affect them. | [Times file photo]
  2. Dirk Koetter to Bucs: Take your complaints to someone who can help

    Bucs

    TAMPA — It was just another day of aching bellies at One Save Face.

    Dirk Koetter: “All of our issues are self-inflicted right now.”
  3. Seminole Heights murders: fear and warnings, but no answers

    Crime

    TAMPA — Interim Tampa police Chief Brian Dugan elicited loud gasps from the crowd of about 400 who showed up at Edison Elementary School on Monday night to learn more about the string of unsolved killings that have left the southeast Seminole Heights neighborhood gripped by fear.

    Kimberly Overman, left, comforts Angelique Dupree, center, as she spoke about the death of her nephew Benjamin Mitchell, 22, last week in Seminole Heights. The Tampa Police Department held a town hall meeting Monday night where concerned residents hoped to learn more about the investigation into the three shooting deaths over 11 days in southeast Seminole Heights. But police could give the crowd at Edison Elementary School few answers. [OCTAVIO JONES   |   Times]
  4. Juvenile justice reform seen as help for teen car theft problem

    Crime

    ST. PETERSBURG — One of Tampa Bay's largest religious organizations has decided to make reforming the juvenile justice system one of its top priorities for next year.

    One of Tampa Bay's largest religious organizations, Faith & Action for Strength Together (FAST), voted Monday night to make reforming the juvenile justice system one of its top priorities for next year. FAST believes civil citations could help Pinellas County?€™s teen car theft epidemic by keeping children out of the juvenile justice system for minor offenses. [ZACHARY T. SAMPSON  |  Times]
  5. U.S. general lays out Niger attack details; questions remain (w/video)

    War

    WASHINGTON — The U.S. Special Forces unit ambushed by Islamic militants in Niger didn't call for help until an hour into their first contact with the enemy, the top U.S. general said Monday, as he tried to clear up some of the murky details of the assault that killed four American troops and has triggered a nasty …

    Gen. Joseph Dunford said much is still unclear about the ambush.