Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Sheriff's Office employee resigns after being accused of theft

LARGO — A Pinellas Sheriff's Office employee resigned last month amid allegations that she snatched a 24-karat bracelet from the security entrance of the Pinellas County Justice Center, according to internal affairs records.

On Feb. 7, criminal justice specialist Bridget Kolodziej was working near the X-Ray machine when she noticed a bracelet on top of it and placed the jewelry in her pocket. When other employees realized it was missing, they began searching for it in front of Kolodziej, who did not tell them she had the bracelet, according to records.

But video surveillance captured Kolodziej as she snatched the jewelry. During a meeting with her supervisors after they watched the video, she admitted to taking the jewelry and turned it in.

The bracelet was returned to its owner.

In an interview with investigators, Kolodziej said she took the bracelet because she thought it belonged to her, adding she owns similar pieces of jewelry.

"I felt awful," she told investigators. "I would never have kept anything that wasn't mine ever because I'm not that person."

Kolodziej, 39, was hired at the Sheriff's Office in December 2012 and was in the process of becoming a detention deputy, records show.

She could not be reached for comment Monday.

Contact Laura C. Morel at lmorel@tampabay.com or (727)445-4157. On Twitter: @lauracmorel.

Sheriff's Office employee resigns after being accused of theft 06/16/14 [Last modified: Monday, June 16, 2014 4:37pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Back in bargaining, Hillsborough school district and its teachers are $50 million apart

    Blogs

    It started off nice and friendly. Gretchen Saunders, chief business officer for the Hillsborough County Public Schools passed candy around the room. Negotiators for the district and the teachers' union commended one another for their good work during Hurricane Irma. The union thanked the district for paying everybody a …

    This a breakdown of what the school district says the teachers' union requests would cost if granted. The union rejects many of these numbers.
  2. Federal study says humans harmed by dispersant used during Deepwater Horizon

    Water

    A first-of-its-kind scientific study has determined that the dispersant BP sprayed at the oil gushing from the Deepwater Horizon rig in 2010 harmed human health.

  3. Across Tampa Bay, local commercial banks and credit unions appear healthy

    Banking

    In another sign of economic vitality, Florida's home-grown banking industry demonstrated strong bench strength in the latest quarterly analysis by Bauer Financial. The vast majority of commercial banks with headquarters in Florida received five "stars" from Bauer, which is the highest ranking of health on its 0-to-5 …

    Several years ago, First Home Bank in Seminole faced regulators breathing down its neck for inaedquate controls and financial weakness. Under CEO 
Anthony N. Leo, the bank has rebounded. It received a top-rated "5" star rating from Bauer Financial in the latest quarter. Most area banks are doing better these days. [SCOTT KEELER      |     TIMES]
  4. Two linemen lose their wedding rings in Tampa Bay. So far one has been found and returned.

    Human Interest

    Two linemen who spent days restoring power in the Tampa Bay area had the same unfortunate mishap: They lost their wedding rings.

    Facebook helped Michael White find the wedding ring he lost while helping restore power in Tampa Bay.
  5. Need is now for new mental health center at Bay Pines, veterans say

    Veterans

    ST. PETERSBURG — Veteran Ellsworth "Tony" Williams says the Bay Pines VA Healthcare System's new mental health center will help fill an immediate need.

    The new mental health center at the Bay Pines VA Healthcare System stands four stories tall and was built at a cost of $92 million. It will centralize services that before were scattered. [HOWARD ALTMAN   |   Staff]