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Loose pit bulls that bit two people in St. Petersburg to be euthanized

ST. PETERSBURG — Three pit bulls, which bit two people earlier this month, are scheduled to be euthanized.

Officials with Pinellas County Animal Services determined those pit bulls — among five that big two people on July 3 at a residence at 2104 21st St. S. — have been classified as dangerous.

Five pit bulls had gotten out of the home through open windows that had no screens, according to St. Petersburg Police.

Before authorities arrived, the dogs had already bitten Robin Macon, 62, multiple times. She was hospitalized with severe injuries.

The dogs also bit Laquanda Butler, 52, on the leg.

PREVIOUS COVERAGE:Loose pit bulls bite two in St. Petersburg

The dogs charged at police officers, too, as they tried to leave their patrol cars. Officers had to use fire extinguishers to force them back.

Police subdued the dogs with pepper spray once they got them back inside and closed the windows.

The dogs were placed under a 10-day quarantine while Animal Services conducted a "dangerous dog" investigation.

Based on information from the victims, three of the dogs have been classified as dangerous in accordance with Pinellas County code and state statute, officials said.

It was also determined that the two other dogs did not approach or harm th ewomen.

The owners, who were not home when the dogs escaped, were issued multiple citations for violations relating to the incident, including one for failure to properly vaccinate and license all five animals, officials said.

The three dogs classified as dangerous were surrendered by the owners to Animal Services to be euthanized. One of the dogs that didn't cause harm has been surrendered for further evaluation to be placed for adoption. The other dog was returned to the owners after proper vaccination and licensing.

"Pinellas County Animal Services is committed to promoting responsible pet ownership and ensuring public safety and animal welfare," officials said.

To learn more about the definition of a dangerous dog in accordance with county code and state statute, visit the Pinellas County Animal Services website.

Loose pit bulls that bit two people in St. Petersburg to be euthanized 07/14/17 [Last modified: Friday, July 14, 2017 8:04am]
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