Second Parkland student dies by apparent suicide

The death is the second of its kind in less than a week.
A memorial of flowers and colorful stones and messages adorn the corner of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High school campus on the first anniversary of the mass shooting. [Associated Press]
A memorial of flowers and colorful stones and messages adorn the corner of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High school campus on the first anniversary of the mass shooting. [Associated Press]
Published March 24
Updated March 24

For the second time in less than a week, a student who survived last year’s mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland has died by apparent suicide, police confirmed Sunday.

The male juvenile, who was still a student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas, died Saturday night, according to Coral Springs Police spokesman Tyler Reik. Detectives and the county medical examiner’s office are continuing to investigate the matter.

Reik said the student's name and personal information will not be released because he is still a juvenile.

The student's death comes just days after the family of 19-year-old Sydney Aiello confirmed Friday she had died by suicide after struggling with post-traumatic stress disorder and survivor’s guilt that stemmed from the February 2018 shooting, where 17 people were killed.

Media reports indicated that Aiello had been close friends with Meadow Pollack, a Marjory Stoneman Douglas senior who died in last year's massacre.

The announcement of the student’s death comes on the anniversary of March for Our Lives, the student-led demonstration against gun violence that was held in Washington and several other U.S. cities last year, and on the final day before Marjory Stoneman Douglas students return to school from spring break.

On Sunday, David Hogg, a survivor of last year's shooting who has since become a prominent gun violence activist, called for officials to do more to prevent such deaths.

"How many more kids have to be taken from us as a result of suicide for the government/school district to do anything?," Hogg Tweeted.

If you or someone you know needs help, call 1-800-273-8255 for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. You can also text HOME to 741-741 for free, 24-hour support from the Crisis Text Line.

Contact Josh Fiallo at jfiallo@tampabay.com. Follow @ByJoshFiallo.

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