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Study: Texting while driving now leading cause of death for teen drivers

NEW YORK — Texting while driving has become a greater hazard than drinking and driving among teenagers who openly acknowledge sending and reading text messages while behind the wheel of a moving vehicle.

Researchers at Cohen Children's Medical Center in New York estimate more than 3,000 annual teen deaths nationwide from texting and 300,000 injuries.

The habit now surpasses the number of teens who drink and drive, researchers say.

An estimated 2,700 young people die each year as a result of driving under the influence of alcohol and 282,000 are treated in emergency rooms for injuries suffered in motor-vehicle crashes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Dr. Andrew Adesman and a team of Cohen investigators found that while driving between September 2010 and December 2011, among 8,947 teenagers aged 15-18 nationwide, an estimated 49 percent of boys admitted to texting while driving compared with 45 percent of girls.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration acknowledged Wednesday that distracted driving of all kinds, including the use of handheld cellphones, is a growing hazard.

Observational surveys cited by the agency suggest more than 100,000 drivers are texting at any given daylight moment, while more than 600,000 drivers are using handheld phones while operating a car.

Study: Texting while driving now leading cause of death for teen drivers 05/09/13 [Last modified: Thursday, May 9, 2013 10:33pm]
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