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Republicans maintaining status quo control

WASHINGTON — Republicans drove toward renewed control of the House on Tuesday as Democrats failed to make any significant inroads into the GOP's delegations from the East, South and Midwest.

With more than half of the 435 House races called by the Associated Press, Republicans had won 151 seats and were leading in 53 more. Democrats had taken 89 districts and led in 56 others.

There were another 20 seats in Western states where Republican incumbents were not facing serious challenges, but those polls remained open. A party needs 218 seats to control the House.

Democrats grabbed their first GOP seat of the night, defeating 10-term GOP veteran Rep. Roscoe Bartlett of Maryland in a race that was preordained after Democrats controlling the state Legislature added more Democratic suburbs near Washington to his western Maryland district.

But in an Election Day that was producing little net change in the parties' numbers overall, Republicans responded by ousting one Democrat from Kentucky and another from North Carolina. They also picked up an open Democratic seat in both North Carolina and Oklahoma.

Even before renewed GOP control was clinched, House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio — re-elected to his seat without opposition — claimed victory and laid down a marker for upcoming battles in Congress.

"The American people want solutions, and tonight they responded by renewing our House Republican majority," he said at a gathering of Republicans in Washington. "The American people also made clear there's no mandate for raising tax rates."

One of the top fights when Congress returns for a postelection session this month will be over the looming expiration of income tax cuts first enacted a decade ago under President George W. Bush. Republicans want to renew them all, while President Barack Obama wants the cuts to expire for the highest-earning Americans.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., refused to concede. She told Democrats rallying a few blocks away from the GOP rally where Boehner spoke that by evening's end, Democrats would end up "exceeding everyone's expectations and perhaps achieving 25," the number of added seats Democrats would need to gain House control.

A glimmer of hope remained for some Democratic gains as 11 members of the tea party backed House GOP freshman class of 2010 were trailing in incomplete returns.

GOP lawyer Andy Barr defeated Democrat Ben Chandler after losing to him by just 647 votes in 2010. Chandler, among a dwindling number of moderate Blue Dog Democrats, has represented the district in Kentucky horse country surrounding Lexington, since 2004 but faced voters who heavily favored Republican challenger Mitt Romney, who easily carried the state over Obama.

Republicans also ousted Rep. Larry Kissell of North Carolina, a two-term veteran who was among several Democrats in the state who faced far tougher districts due to GOP-controlled redistricting. By mid-evening, Republicans had also picked up two open seats in the state, including one abandoned by Democratic Rep. Heath Shuler, who announced his retirement after it became clear that his district would have been harder for him to win.

Others re-elected included House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va.; No. 2 House Democrat Steny Hoyer of Maryland; and Rep. James Clyburn of South Carolina, another top Democrat.

Also winning was Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., D-Ill., who took medical leave from Congress in June and has been at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota for treatment of bipolar disorder.

Republicans maintaining status quo control 11/06/12 [Last modified: Wednesday, November 7, 2012 12:39am]
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