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Fingerprint reader keeps memory stick data safe

Ceelox’s 2 gigabyte flash memory stick has an integrated fingerprint reader, ensuring that no one else can access your data.

MELISSA LYTTLE | Times

Ceelox’s 2 gigabyte flash memory stick has an integrated fingerprint reader, ensuring that no one else can access your data.

Forget about wracking your brains trying to remember that crazy password, or sweating over that misplaced memory stick with your financial information. Tampa-based Ceelox says its software allows you to access and secure your computer, e-mail or memory stick with the touch of a finger.
How does it work?

About two years ago, the company launched products that secure computers, files and network logins with biometrics. Through a fingerprint reader embedded on the laptop, memory stick or keyboard or added through a USB port, customers can gain access.

Why is it deemed more secure?

Fingerprint biometrics can be used for password replacement or can add two-factor authentication to any computer or laptop, providing an extra dose of security.

"It eliminates passwords being stolen by key loggers or password snipers and alleviates the problem of people forgetting their password," said Kass Aiken, Ceelox's president and chief operating officer.
How much does
the software cost?

A USB fingerprint reader costs $50 while software for a stand-alone addition costs $50. If the software is integrated with a server and active directory, the server addition is $4,995 plus a per user license of $24.95

Who's using Ceelox
in Florida?

Early adopters of the software include Kissimmee Utility Authority, Old Southern Bank and Aasys, a Tampa-based system integrator.
What do experts say
about biometrics?

"Data security is a very big problem," said Avivah Litan, a Gartner analyst. "And year after year our consumer survey shows a strong interest in … biometrics."

"It's (biometrics) a big trend," said Balaji Padmanabhan, associate professor of information and decision sciences at University of South Florida's School of Business. "The technology has caught on in commercial spaces such as theme parks. It's a question of time before everyone adopts a better security system."

Fingerprint reader keeps memory stick data safe 04/16/08 [Last modified: Thursday, April 17, 2008 11:51am]

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