Monday, June 25, 2018
News Roundup

Will paper maps fold for good thanks to GPS devices?

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Used to be, Dad would stuff a half-dozen maps in the glove box before setting out with the family on a road trip. Colorful maps bearing the logos of the oil companies that printed them once brimmed from displays at filling stations, free for the taking.

But of the more than 35 million Americans expected to travel by car this summer, a good chunk will probably reach for technology before they're tempted to unfold a paper road map.

Websites like MapQuest and Google Maps simplified trip planning. Affordable GPS devices and built-in navigation on smartphones transformed it — and transportation agencies around the country are noticing, printing fewer maps to cut department costs or just acknowledging that public demand is down.

The drop in sales began around 2003, when affordable GPS units became go-to Christmas presents, said Pat Carrier, former owner of a travel bookstore in Cambridge, Mass. "Suddenly, everyone was buying a Garmin or a TomTom," he said. "That's the year I thought, 'Oh, it's finally happened.' "

Transportation departments around the country are reprioritizing their spending amid times of falling revenue, and paper maps could be on the chopping block, said Bob Cullen, spokesman for the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials.

"Just based on the current climate, there have been some cuts," he said. "I would expect map printing to be one area that's been targeted."

In late June, at the annual exposition of the Road Map Collectors Association in Dublin, Ohio, collector Terry Palmer was selling some of his beloved maps. The 65-year-old from Dallas wore a T-shirt with intricate route lines of the United States on his chest, back and arms.

"The GPS of course now being so available, a lot of new cars are coming out with built-in GPS. People are utilizing those, and they don't want a road map," he said. "A lot of the younger generation, they're used to having their phone, and they don't need a road map to figure out where to go."

In Georgia, officials are printing about 1.6 million maps to cover a two-year period — less than half of what they were printing a decade ago. In Pennsylvania, where officials say public demand has gone down, about 750,000 maps are being printed — down from more than 3 million in 2000.

Officials in Oklahoma and Ohio also say map printing is down, and Washington state discontinued them altogether by 2009 because of budget shortfalls.

But in other states, printing has remained steady because maps remain popular at visitor centers.

There's a universal theme to paper road maps, especially for baby boomers traveling after retirement, said Kevin Nursick, spokesman for Connecticut's transportation department. Paper maps, he said, offer an experience that dead batteries and unreliable service connections cannot.

Free roadside maps boomed between the 1920s and 1970s, when oil companies worked with a handful of publishers. As major highways were being built, those maps became synonymous with the possibilities of the open road.

Dick Bloom, a founding member of the Road Map Collectors Association, has been collecting maps since he was 10. The retired airline pilot from Danville, Ky., said there used to be an element of surprise in road trips. "The paper map was all you had back then," Bloom, 74, said from his merchandise table. "It was the only way to get around. It was a lot more of an adventure back then."

Transportation agencies aren't the only ones printing paper road maps. Companies like AAA and Rand McNally have been in the business for decades and are just as synonymous with trip planning.

Members of AAA, whose services are fully integrated online and include a TripTik mobile app, requested more than 14 million paper guides in 2010, spokeswoman Heather Hunter said. The number of paper maps AAA prints has declined, but she wouldn't go into detail.

Rand McNally is known for its road atlases but also offers an interactive travel website and GPS devices; it declined to comment on how many maps it's printing these days.

Carrier, now a consultant in the mapping and travel publishing industry, said the additional services from traditional mapping companies show the incredible potential in the industry. "There's no question in the U.S. that traditional road maps are diminished," he said. "But there are other areas of the map industry that are thriving and even growing."

Charlie Regan, who runs the maps division for National Geographic, said the company has sold more paper map products in the past three years than it has ever sold since launching the division in 1915. He attributed it to customers learning to appreciate good map data — and also noted that sales of international maps have remained consistent, and that sales of recreational hiking maps are on the rise.

Comments
Tampa Bay’s ‘Fabulous Sports Babe’ voted into National Radio Hall of Fame

Tampa Bay’s ‘Fabulous Sports Babe’ voted into National Radio Hall of Fame

Tampa Bay resident Nanci Donnellan, long known to radio listeners as "The Fabulous Sports Babe," has been voted into the National Radio Hall of Fame.Donnellan,the first woman to ever host a nationally syndicated sports talk radio program,&#...
Updated: 14 minutes ago

Tuesday’s letters: Here’s what a legal immigrant went through to become a U.S. citizen

Trump says those who ‘invade’ shouldbe sent back | June 25How I becamea U.S. citizenI am a legal immigrant. I don’t know where this country went awry, but let me remind you of how legal immigration worked. In 1964 I applied for a visa at the U.S....
Updated: 18 minutes ago
Driver deliberately struck family riding on New Tampa bike path, killing father, police say

Driver deliberately struck family riding on New Tampa bike path, killing father, police say

TAMPA — Pedro Aguerreberry pedaled along New Tampa Boulevard on Sunday pulling his son Bennett in a trailer as his other son Lucas rode alongside them.As father and sons headed east on a paved bike path, a former star track and field athlete named Mi...
Updated: 25 minutes ago
With more floods, fear flows, too

With more floods, fear flows, too

OLD FORT, N.C. - Brian Gentry was certain his 33,000-pound truck would be fine as he headed out into the heavy rains here in the Blue Ridge Mountains. But as he went to clear debris from a two-lane highway after more than a half-foot of rain, rocklik...
Updated: 1 hour ago
FHP: Pedestrian dies Monday in Spring Hill crash

FHP: Pedestrian dies Monday in Spring Hill crash

SPRING HILL — A Kentucky woman was killed around 2 a.m. Monday after a vehicle hit her as she was walking along Hayes Street.Kathellyn Pereira, 22, was driving eastbound in the inside lane on Northcliffe Boulevard approaching Hayes Street, authoritie...
Updated: 1 hour ago
The Old Man from ‘Pawn Stars,’ Richard Harrison, dies at 77

The Old Man from ‘Pawn Stars,’ Richard Harrison, dies at 77

LAS VEGAS — Pawn Stars patriarch, Richard Benjamin Harrison, who was known as "The Old Man," has died at age 77. Gold & Silver Pawn’s Facebook page posted Monday that Harrison was surrounded by "loving family" this past weekend and died peacefully. T...
Updated: 1 hour ago
Delta is banning pit bull service dogs, which might not be legal

Delta is banning pit bull service dogs, which might not be legal

Amid growing scrutiny of animals in airplane cabins, several airlines have unveiled tightened policies aimed at limiting the number of untrained pets or unusual species on flights. The changes, they have said, are driven by safety considerations and ...
Updated: 2 hours ago
USF considering former Arkansas athletic director Jeff Long

USF considering former Arkansas athletic director Jeff Long

While Tom Jurich remains the preferred choice among several prominent USF boosters (and some coaches) for the Bulls' athletic director gig, our intel has revealed another former Power Five AD also is getting a serious look.Jeff Long, who spent nearly...
Updated: 2 hours ago
Driver who caused crash that damaged Hillsborough deputy’s patrol car was drunk, authorities say

Driver who caused crash that damaged Hillsborough deputy’s patrol car was drunk, authorities say

TAMPA — Panfilo Hernandez Saldana’s drive came to an abrupt end Friday night when he caused a crash that damaged a Hillsborough County sheriff’s vehicle, according to a Sheriff’s Office news release.Saldana, 30, rammed into the back of another car th...
Updated: 3 hours ago
Top 5 at noon: What’s taking FDLE so long in Jack Latvala investigation? court dismisses suit by Tampa man who claims William Shatner is his father; and more

Top 5 at noon: What’s taking FDLE so long in Jack Latvala investigation? court dismisses suit by Tampa man who claims William Shatner is his father; and more

Here are the latest headlines and updates on tampabay.com.IN JACK LATVALA INVESTIGATION, WHAT’S TAKING FDLE SO LONG?It has been nearly six months since the Florida Department of Law Enforcement launched an investigation of former Sen. Jack Latvala o...
Updated: 3 hours ago