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SPONSORED CONTENT: Famous Admiral Al Konetzni, nuclear submarine naval commander, joins World Patent Marketing

Admiral Al Konetzni (ret.) has joined the World Patent Marketing Advisory Board. Adm. Konetzni assumed his duties as Rear Admiral, Commander Submarine Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet in 1998, where he remained until retirement from the Navy. [SPONSORED CONTENT]

Admiral Al Konetzni (ret.) has joined the World Patent Marketing Advisory Board. Adm. Konetzni assumed his duties as Rear Admiral, Commander Submarine Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet in 1998, where he remained until retirement from the Navy. [SPONSORED CONTENT]

Famous Admiral Al Konetzni has joined the World Patent Marketing Advisory Board. The now retired submarine naval commander became famous worldwide when he appeared in the BBC television series,The Silent War, which recounted the submarine skirmishes and tactics during the Cold War.

Konetzni, known as "Big Al" to seamen and friends, commanded a daring chase of a Russian sub beneath the Arctic Sea ice. He described the cracking and creaking of the ice as "loud and maddening, verging on the sounds of an insane asylum." His sub and crew stalked the Russians for weeks, long after they had run out of essential supplies. At the time of his retirement, Konetzni was the naval commander of the entire Pacific submarine fleet.

"It is my honor and privilege to join the World Patent Marketing board." said Admiral Konetzni, "It is an incredible opportunity to be able to work with Scott Cooper and the rest of the board. His enthusiasm for creativity and innovation is contagious. And his commitment to innovation and discovering new ways to protect freedom and democracy around the world is inspiring."

"This is truly an honor," said Scott Cooper, CEO and Creative Director for World Patent Marketing. "Gene Hackman, Sean Connery, and Denzel Washington play him in the movies. He was commanding nuclear submarines, protecting our country and hunting the Russians during the Cold War while we were sitting back watching it on CNN. Admiral Konetzni is a true patriot, and I am very excited to work with him."

Submariners are a special breed. The work is dangerous, intense, and highly technical. Commanding a sub is one of the most daunting tasks in the entire military. Admiral Konetzni rose to the challenge, earning the respect and admiration of both his superiors and rank and file sailors. His retirement was attended by over 500 people, including famous celebrities like Larry King.

Every naval commander has highly technical and practical training, and the sub commanders even more so. Konetzni brings this valuable skill set to the World Patent Marketing Advisory Board. Besides, his numerous connections to the highest levels of the military chain of command, as well as publishing and film celebrities, make him an invaluable addition to the Board.

Konetzni has a string of military decorations, and accolades that could fill a room, but his most prized possession is the esteem of his men. He is affectionately known as "Big Al the Sailor's Pal" by everyone in the Navy, from the highest to the lowest ranks. Big Al brought something different to the table. He put his men first. They knew it and responded by working twice as hard for this Admiral whom they not only obeyed, but admired.

Most commanders regard submarine duty as unpleasant at best. The quarters are cramped, the view is limited, the work is incredibly challenging and stressful. Konetzni loved it, partly because the close quarters created a leveling effect among the ranks. Living in such tight spaces, under such enormous mental stress, forced the typical formal barriers between crew and officers to come down. Sure there is a chain of command on a sub, and a strict one at that, but running a submarine is a team effort. Konetzni was masterful at getting the most out of every man and woman in his fleet.

Konetzni began his naval career in 1962, having been inspired to be a sailor by the television series Men of Annapolis. He entered the United States Naval Academy, graduating in 1966 with merit. He then attended Naval Submarine School in New London, Connecticut, followed by Nuclear Power School in Mare Island, California, and completed his nuclear training at Naval Nuclear Power Prototype Training in West Milton, New York. He eventually earned a Master's Degree from George Washington University in Industrial Personnel Management.

His first submarine assignment was in 1968 aboard the USS Mariano G. Vallejo. He quickly rose through the ranks and by 1991 served as Chief of Staff to Commander Submarine Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet. He served in Yokosuka, Japan, in the '90s, as Commander Submarine Group SEVEN. He assumed his duties as Rear Admiral, Commander Submarine Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet in 1998, where he remained until retirement from the Navy.

He has earned numerous awards and honors including the Legion of Merit with a silver star, the Meritorious Service Medal with two gold stars, the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal with two gold stars, and the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal. In 1997, the Republic of Korea awarded him the Order of National Security Merit Cheonsu. He is the coauthor of the book Command at Sea.

World Patent Marketing CEO Scott Cooper and the entire staff, welcome Admiral Konetzni on board. He will be a tremendous asset to our invention marketing efforts, particularly for defense-related inventions.

Do you ever wonder "how much does it cost to patent an idea?" Send your cool invention ideas to World Patent Marketing today.

The above article is sponsor-generated content from WPM Insider. To learn more, email sales@tampabay.com

SPONSORED CONTENT: Famous Admiral Al Konetzni, nuclear submarine naval commander, joins World Patent Marketing 10/25/16 [Last modified: Tuesday, October 25, 2016 10:25am]
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