Friday, June 22, 2018
News Roundup

Surprise discovery of brain tumor ends in relief, recovery for 15-year-old Valrico girl

ST. PETERSBURG — For Ashlee Gordon, the double vision came and went.

Her doctors had different theories over the years. One thought it was an eye problem. Another suggested it was allergies. Another still said Ashlee was perfectly fine.

But when the 15-year-old from Valrico started seeing black spots, her mother decided to get to the bottom of it.

Last Thursday, mother and daughter went to an optometrist at Brandon Town Center Mall. Dr. Sylvia Bernatsky performed the usual battery of eye exams; everything seemed normal.

But after dilating Ashlee's pupils, Bernatsky became concerned.

Both of the girl's optic nerves were swollen — a red flag.

Bernatsky told Jamie Wilson to take her daughter to St. Joseph's Children's Hospital in Tampa immediately. The girl needed an MRI. There was pressure building in her head.

Wilson did as she was told.

• • •

Ashlee had never really complained about the double vision, Wilson thought as she waited in the emergency room with her daughter. It hadn't stopped her from excelling at dance, or taking up acro, a dance style that combines classical techniques with gymnastics.

She was always singing, smiling, performing.

Now, she was sitting in a hospital bed.

The MRI revealed the unimaginable: a tumor the size of a small plum on Ashlee's brain stem. It was growing on her cerebellum, the part of the brain that makes the eyes move together, among other things.

The growth was affecting more than just Ashlee's vision. It was large enough to plug the drainage system in her brain, causing fluid to back up in her skull.

She needed surgery — and urgently.

Two days later, Ashlee traveled by ambulance to Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital in St. Petersburg, which has a new Institute for Brain Protection Sciences. On the ride over, she watched Tangled, a movie about the adventures of a feisty young princess.

• • •

The surgery was scheduled for 7:30 a.m. Tuesday.

It was inherently risky. Like other surgeries on the brain, the procedure had the potential to affect Ashlee's speech and vision, and her ability to eat and drink.

Jamie Wilson wondered if her daughter would wake up the same person. She asked for prayers on a Facebook page she created called Ashlee's Journey.

The first priority was to put a drainage tube in Ashlee's brain, said Dr. Gerald Tuite, a pediatric neurosurgeon who performed the procedure with Dr. George Jallo.

"That helped relieve the pressure," Tuite said.

The surgeons made an incision down the back of Ashlee's neck and removed a piece of bone from the back of her skull. They then removed the tumor and replaced the bone.

It took about four hours, Tuite said.

The doctors delivered two pieces of good news to Jamie Wilson that morning.

First: Ashlee had awoken after surgery and wasn't likely to have any long-term problems with swallowing, speaking or her vision.

Also: The tumor was benign.

Wilson shared her joy on Facebook.

"GOD IS SO SO GOOD ALL THE TIME!"

• • •

About 4,600 children will be diagnosed with a brain tumor this year, according to the American Brain Tumor Association. It isn't clear what causes them, or why some kids are more susceptible than others.

The cerebellum is a particularly common spot.

Tuite, the pediatric neurosurgeon, said Ashlee showed grit.

"I've removed tumors in this location from hundreds of kids," he said. "I'd say she is one of the strongest. It's a hard thing to go through. She's always smiling. She always has good attitude."

Ashlee, who is home-schooled, knows she has a long recovery ahead. She'll be in the hospital for at least another week. It could take months for her double vision to go away entirely.

But Ashlee has kept her spirits up.

On Friday — three days after surgery — she sat up in bed and had a conversation with her mom. She wore a pair of fashionable, dark sunglasses to keep the light out of her eyes.

Ashlee asked her mom about attending a dance competition next month. While that was out of the question, her mother assured her she would get back to her favorite pastime again soon.

"We're blessed," her mother said.

Contact Kathleen McGrory at [email protected] or (727) 893-8330. Follow @kmcgrory.

Comments
The Daystarter: The Jameis Winston fallout; from CIA agents to minivan drivers; Pride comes back together in 2018

The Daystarter: The Jameis Winston fallout; from CIA agents to minivan drivers; Pride comes back together in 2018

Catching you up on overnight happenings, and what to know today.   • Get ready for a wet morning as the forecast calls for scattered showers and storms to start the day. There could even be thundershowers and lightning out there, according to...
Updated: 1 hour ago
Boy George, coming to Tampa with Culture Club, talks fame, Pulse and the term ‘LGBTQ’

Boy George, coming to Tampa with Culture Club, talks fame, Pulse and the term ‘LGBTQ’

It’ll still be June when Boy George arrives in Florida this week to kick off a summer U.S. tour with Culture Club. But the LGBTQ icon says it won’t feel quite like a Pride parade. "I also bake cakes for straight people," he laughed. "Tha...
Updated: 1 hour ago
Pride divided no more: St. Pete Pride comes back together

Pride divided no more: St. Pete Pride comes back together

ST. PETERSBURG — The 16th annual St. Pete Pride Parade is getting ready to march along the downtown waterfront the second straight year. But many hope to move past the division caused last year when the parade was uprooted from its original hom...
Updated: 1 hour ago
Florida eliminates Texas Tech at College World Series, faces Arkansas for title-round spot

Florida eliminates Texas Tech at College World Series, faces Arkansas for title-round spot

OMAHA, Neb. — JJ Schwarz hit a two-run homer and Florida built enough cushion to survive Texas Tech's six-run outburst over the seventh and eighth innings to eliminate the Red Raiders from the College World Series with a 9-6 win Thursday night....
Updated: 7 hours ago
Carlton: Could anything be more partisan than going nonpartisan?

Carlton: Could anything be more partisan than going nonpartisan?

So Hillsborough County commissioners — most of them, anyway — want voters to consider dropping political parties from certain elections, making those races nonpartisan instead.This would mean when you go to vote in those elections, you won’t know if ...
Published: 06/22/18
Joe Henderson: Hillsborough teachers have come to depend on foundation’s free supplies

Joe Henderson: Hillsborough teachers have come to depend on foundation’s free supplies

We have all heard stories about public school teachers reaching into their own pockets so their students will have basic classroom supplies.It goes on throughout the system because budgets are tight. The money allotted for pencils, markers, notebooks...
Published: 06/22/18
Kevin Knox to Knicks makes NBA history locally

Kevin Knox to Knicks makes NBA history locally

More than a year ago, Kevin Knox stepped across the stage at the Straz Center to receive his high school diploma.On Thursday, the former Tampa Catholic star was on basketball's biggest stage as he fulfilled his lifelong goal of making the NBA.Knox wa...
Updated: 1 hour ago
Editorial: With Supreme Court ruling, Florida should collect sales tax from online retailers

Editorial: With Supreme Court ruling, Florida should collect sales tax from online retailers

It turns out the U.S. Supreme Court has a better grasp of the economic realities of the 21st century than Congress or the Florida Legislature. The court ruled Thursday that states can require online retailers to collect sales taxes even if the retail...
Updated: 1 hour ago
Plant City’s champion Al Berry, whose name shouted his passion, dead at 83

Plant City’s champion Al Berry, whose name shouted his passion, dead at 83

His name was Berry and berry was his passion — the strawberry that put his beloved Plant City on the map.Alfred "Al" Berry was born with the name, but he took on his role as chief promoter of Plant City through his four decades of work with the commu...
Updated: 1 hour ago
Missed time a good mental reset for Rays’ Matt Duffy

Missed time a good mental reset for Rays’ Matt Duffy

ST. PETERSBURG — Missing all of 2017 might have been the absolute worst thing for Matt Duffy.Frustratingly idled as he eventually recovered and rehabbed from ongoing left heel issues, he couldn't play the game he loved, couldn't show the Rays o...
Updated: 7 hours ago