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Syrian opposition continues despite government crackdown

Muslims support Syrian protests after Friday prayers in Sidon, Lebanon. The Arabic on banners reads: “remove the siege from Daraa,” “where are the human rights” and “no for lying.”

Associated Press

Muslims support Syrian protests after Friday prayers in Sidon, Lebanon. The Arabic on banners reads: “remove the siege from Daraa,” “where are the human rights” and “no for lying.”

BEIRUT — Syrian troops used heavy machine guns and artillery to quell antigovernment demonstrations in the key city of Homs on Friday in a sharp escalation of their crackdown against regime opponents, as tens of thousands of Syrians again defied the threat of bullets and tanks to take to the streets around the country.

Witnesses reached by telephone in Homs on Friday evening said they could hear what sounded like pitched battles in several neighborhoods, prompting speculation that some members of the security forces had defected.

Syrian state television reported that 10 members of the security forces had been killed in Homs by "armed gangs," the term used by the government to describe the protesters. But there have been no indications that any members of the seemingly spontaneous and mostly leaderless protest movement are armed.

At least 26 people were killed when Syrian forces opened fire on demonstrators, with 11 deaths reported in Homs and six in the nearby town of Hama, said Wissam Tarif of the human rights group Insan.

The clashes in Homs came amid signs that Syrians have not been cowed by the hundreds of deaths and thousands of arrests carried out in recent weeks in an effort to suppress the biggest challenge to the regime since President Bashar al-Assad's father put down an armed revolt in Hama in 1982.

That crackdown, in which as many as 40,000 people died, earned the Syrian regime a reputation as one of the most repressive in the Middle East, and when revolts began rippling around the region earlier in the year, many predicted that Syrians would not dare join the swelling clamor for change.

But although Syrians came relatively late to the game, with no significant protests reported until mid March, their opposition movement seems only to have swelled in the face of the government's increasingly brutal crackdown. Human rights groups say more than 500 people have been killed, most of them at demonstrations, and at least 5,000 arrested.

As the government has responded to the unrest with escalating force, so has the protest movement persisted and spread, and it now seems clear that much of the country is in open revolt against the regime.

Responding to calls by activists to stage a "day of defiance" to protest the security crackdown, people swarmed out of mosques after noontime prayers, many of them calling for the overthrow of the regime.

In Damascus, which has remained largely immune to the unrest, security forces detained veteran opposition activist Riad Seif as he emerged from a mosque. Security forces dispersed a small demonstration there Friday with tear gas and ammunition.

There was no indication that this week's protests were any larger than those on the previous two Fridays, when troops also used live fire to disperse protesters.

Syrian opposition continues despite government crackdown 05/06/11 [Last modified: Friday, May 6, 2011 10:18pm]
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