Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

The Glazers' connection to Back to School, and other things you didn't know about the Bucs owners

Bryan Glazer, co-chairman of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, was warmly applauded when he was inducted April 7 into the Florida Council on Economic Education's Tampa Bay Business Hall of Fame.

Then he shared a story remarkable for its simple elements of humanity, family and love.

He told the audience he was a graduate of Irving University — Irving being the middle name of his late father, Malcolm Glazer, the Bucs owner who passed away in 2014 at the age of 85. Growing up in his father's home meant growing up with daily business lessons from the elder Glazer.

Bryan Glazer, 51, recalled how his father once put an ad in the paper to sell his car. Whenever someone came over to kick the tires, the elder Glazer always had his daughter step into the garage about 10 minutes after the prospective buyer's arrival and yell:

"Dad, someone's on the phone about the car."

Bryan Glazer also explained the framed diploma from Irving University that hangs in his home. Signed by his father, the degree anoints the son a graduate of the Melon School of Business. No, not Carnegie Mellon University, home to one of the top business schools in the nation.

This Melon school is named after Thornton Melon, the character played by comedian Rodney Dangerfield in the 1986 movie Back to School. Bryan Glazer's five siblings also have "Irving degrees."

That's right, Malcolm Glazer — the hard-driving businessman who wrung a new stadium out of Hillsborough County voters, hired and fired beloved coach Tony Dungy, made a daring trade for coach Jon Gruden and brought long-suffering Bucs fans a Super Bowl in the 2002 season — was a fan of the uproariously funny film many children of the '80s revere for its bad puns and one-liners.

Who knew?

Furthermore, why did we have to wait this long to get a glimpse into the Glazer family dynamic and its Dangerfield-loving patriarch?

In five short minutes, Bryan Glazer lent the kind of insight reporters — and more importantly, fans — have craved since his father purchased the Buccaneers in 1995.

I found the story riveting, simply because it created common ground between this super-wealthy family and the everyday Joes and Jills who fill Raymond James Stadium every year.

Malcolm Glazer — and, by extension, his family — have always been reluctant to grant interviews. It didn't help that the early days of their ownership were so contentious.

But that was two decades ago. Now it's time for Bryan Glazer to tell a few more stories, show a bit more emotion and stop worrying about delivering the perfect answer or fearing the fallout from an imperfect response.

In February, he joined Rays owner Stu Sternberg and Lightning owner Jeff Vinik for a panel discussion at the Poynter Institute for Media Studies, which owns the Tampa Bay Times. Even though the Bucs' owner shied away from answering some questions, we need more opportunities like that to hear from Bryan Glazer and his family.

I'm not asking him to be as flamboyant as Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones, or show up wearing a T-shirt that says, "I'm Bryan Freaking Glazer" (though that would be fun). But he's enjoyed enough success to be more open.

How can you not like a family that loves Rodney Dangerfield?

That's all I'm saying.

The Glazers' connection to Back to School, and other things you didn't know about the Bucs owners 04/19/16 [Last modified: Tuesday, April 19, 2016 10:10pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Jones: Bucs need success to get national respect

    Bucs

    Tampa Bay Times columnist Tom Jones offers up his Two Cents on the world of sports.

    No respect

    Tampa Bay Buccaneers head coach Dirk Koetter walks the field during the second day of mandatory minicamp at One Buccaneer Place in Tampa, Fla., on Wednesday, June 14, 2017. LOREN ELLIOTT   |   Times
  2. Hopes fade after landslide destroys Chinese village (w/video)

    World

    Crews searching through the night in the rubble left by a landslide that buried a mountain village under tons of soil and rocks in southwestern China found 15 bodies, but more than 110 more people remained missing.

    Vehicles and people line a road leading to the site of a landslide in Xinmo village in Mao County on Saturday in southwestern China’s Sichuan Province. More than 100 people remained missing after the village was buried under tons of rocks and soil.
  3. Rookie Jake Faria dissatisfied with performance in Rays' loss to Orioles

    The Heater

    ST. PETERSBURG — The rookie pitcher walked to his locker Saturday after tossing the fourth quality start in as many tries to begin his career. He held the potent Orioles bats to three runs and for six innings gave his team a chance to win.

    Orioles third baseman Manny Machado tags out the Rays’ Mallex Smith at third after a rundown in the first inning.
  4. Thousands converge in two St. Pete locations celebrating LGBT rights

    Human Interest

    ST. PETERSBURG — Tom Rockhill didn't know what to expect Saturday, but by noon people were knocking on the door of his bar Right Around the Corner in Grand Central.

    (From left to right) Emma Chalut 18, gets a rainbow sticker on her cheek from her sister Ellie, 15 both of Jacksonville before the annual St. Pete Pride parade in downtown St. Petersburg on Saturday. This year the route was changed from the Grand Central and Kenwood area to Bayshore Drive.
[EVE EDELHEIT   |   Times]
  5. Retired Florida Supreme Court Justice Parker Lee McDonald dies

    TALLAHASSEE — A former Florida Supreme Court justice, who wrote a decision that prevented lawyers from excluding jurors because of their race, has died.

    Former Florida Supreme Court Justice Parker Lee McDonald died Saturday, the court said in a statement. He was 93.