Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Today in history, June 12

1776: Virginia's colonial legislature adopted a Declaration of Rights.

Related News/Archive

1920: The Republican National Convention, meeting in Chicago, nominated Warren G. Harding for president on the 10th ballot.

1924: President Calvin Coolidge was nominated for a term of office in his own right at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland. (Coolidge had become president in 1923 upon the sudden death of Harding.)

1939: The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum was dedicated in Coopers­town, N.Y.

1942: Anne Frank, a German-born Jewish girl living in Amsterdam, received a diary for her 13th birthday, less than a month before she and her family went into hiding from the Nazis.

1956: The Flag of the United States Army was officially adopted under an executive order signed by President Dwight D. Eisenhower.

1963: Civil rights leader Medgar Evers, 37, was shot and killed outside his home in Jackson, Miss. (In 1994, Byron De La Beckwith was convicted of murdering Evers and sentenced to life in prison; he died in 2001.)

1965: The British government announced that the Beatles would each be made a Member of the Order of the British Empire by Queen Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace later in the year.

1967: The Supreme Court, in Loving vs. Virginia, struck down state laws prohibiting interracial marriages.

1975: An Indian court found Prime Minister Indira Gandhi guilty of electoral corruption and barred her from holding office for six years; Gandhi rejected calls for her to resign.

1987: President Ronald Reagan, during a visit to the divided German city of Berlin, publicly challenged Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev to "tear down this wall."

1991: Russians went to the polls to elect Boris Yeltsin president of their republic.

1994: Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman were slashed to death outside her Los Angeles home. (O.J. Simpson was later acquitted of the killings in a criminal trial, but was eventually held liable in a civil action.)

Associated Press

Today in history, June 12 06/11/16 [Last modified: Saturday, June 11, 2016 9:27pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

Copyright: For copyright information, please check with the distributor of this item, Associated Press.
    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Comedian and activist Dick Gregory dies at 84

    Nation

    The comedian Dick Gregory rose to national prominence in the early 1960s as a black satirist whose audacious style of humor was biting, subversive and topical, mostly centered on current events, politics and above all, racial tensions. His trademark was the searing punchline.

    Dick Gregory, a comedian, activist and author, died Saturday. [Tribune News Service, 2011]
  2. Winter Haven police investigating armed robbery at Dollar General

    Crime

    WINTER HAVEN — Police are investigating an armed robbery Friday night of a Dollar General store on W Lake Ruby Drive.

  3. Rowdies settle for draw at home

    Soccer

    ST. PETERSBURG — The good news for the Rowdies is that they still haven't lost a game at Al Lang Stadium since late April. The bad news is they had to settle for a 1-1 tie against Ottawa on Saturday night in front of 6,710 sweaty fans.

  4. Bats come to life, but Rays' freefall continues (w/video)

    The Heater

    ST. PETERSBURG —The six runs seemed like a ton, just the second time the Rays had scored that many in a game during their numbing two-plus-weeks stretch of offensive impotency, and amazingly, the first time at the Trop in nearly two months.

    Lucas Duda connects for a two-run home run in the sixth, getting the Rays within 7-5. A Logan Morrison home run in the ninth made it 7-6, but Tampa Bay couldn’t complete the comeback.
  5. 'Free speech rally' cut short after massive counterprotest

    Nation

    BOSTON — Thousands of demonstrators chanting anti-Nazi slogans converged Saturday on downtown Boston in a boisterous repudiation of white nationalism, dwarfing a small group of conservatives who cut short their planned "free speech rally" a week after a gathering of hate groups led to bloodshed in Virginia.

    Thousands of people march against a “free speech rally” planned Saturday in Boston. About 40,000 people were in attendance.