TBX Next: How the $6 billion plan has changed in the last year

In 2014, the state announced an ambitious road project called Tampa Bay Express. Known as TBX, the Florida Department of Transportation planned to add toll lanes to 90 miles of interstates. Here's where the project stands.

Published July 10 2017
Updated July 10 2017

In 2014, the state announced an ambitious road project called Tampa Bay Express. Known as TBX, the Florida Department of Transportation planned to add toll lanes to 90 miles of interstates.

 

Steve Madden | Times

 

Steve Madden | Times

 

That all changed in 2016 when public outcry forced the state to scrap its plans for the Howard Frankland Bridge, put the rest of the $6 billion plan in reset mode and come back with a new project name: Tampa Bay Next.

In January, officials opened a federal study that will re-evaluate parts of the project, including a controversial segment around downtown Tampa and its urban neighborhoods. The supplemental environmental impact study, or SEIS, is expected to be completed in 2019.

Until then, here's where each part of the project stands.

 

Steve Madden | Times

Gateway

 

$545 million, construction begins late 2017

 

The Gateway Expressway will create two elevated roadways from Bayside Bridge and U.S. 19 to Interstate 275. This is the first place Tampa Bay drivers will see toll lanes, with construction starting later this year.

 

Steve Madden | Times

 

Howard Frankland Bridge

 

$694 million, construction begins 2020

 

The state scrapped its bridge plan last year and released a new version in January. The northbound span of the bridge is old and needs to be replaced. Starting in 2020, DOT will replace the northbound span with a new bridge that has two additional lanes for tolls, one in each direction.

 

Steve Madden | Times

 

West Shore and downtown Tampa

 

$2.835 billion for all four segments, final design awaiting results of federal study

 

A big part of the former TBX plan is being reconsidered under a new federal study.

Four segments — the West Shore and downtown Tampa interchanges and spans of I-275 from West Shore through downtown north up to Bearrs Ave. — are part of the study, which is expected to wrap-up in 2019. That study will determine whether toll lanes will run through each of these parts or if the state will go with another option, such as light rail or reconstructing I-275 at street level. The study might also recommend a combination of these options.

 

Steve Madden | Times

 

I-4 and Plant City

 

$281 million, not currently funded

 

Toll lanes would continue east along Interstate 4 to Plant City, and, eventually, into Polk County. These tolls will connect with the Lee Roy Selmon Expressway.

Contact Caitlin Johnston at cjohnston@tampabay.com or (727) 893-8779. Follow @cljohnst.

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