Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Products draw strength from Miami-Dade's lessons

If you go shopping for replacement windows, hurricane shutters or a host of products to strengthen and protect your home, you'll see a Miami-Dade certification sticker. Or a salesperson will tell you that the product is "Miami-Dade approved."

What does that mean?

The product has undergone approval testing, established by Miami-Dade County in the wake of Hurricane Andrew in 1992, that is generally thought to be more strict than that of some other national product-certification groups, explained Tim Reinhold, vice president of engineering at the Institute for Business and Home Safety in Tampa.

"The general feeling is, it's more stringent. In some cases it's more paperwork," he said. "We would recommend to homeowners that if you're looking at, say, a shutter product, get something that is Dade-approved. They have a little bit higher criteria than the rest of the national standards."

Manufacturers have to pay to have their products tested and certified, so the fact that a product doesn't carry a label doesn't necessarily mean it's an ineffective product. It may just mean it hasn't been submitted for testing, which is voluntary.

"You should have better confidence if you do have product approvals," Reinhold said. "A lot of offshore stuff, the material's not up to snuff, it might corrode or not act properly. As a homeowner you're better off buying something with some level of product approval."

Window certification covers the glass and the frame, which are evaluated as a unit because the glass is only as strong as the frame that holds it. Similarly, a garage door is only as strong as its framing. Reinhold cautioned that the way a product behaves in a test doesn't necessarily reflect "what really happens in a real storm. A specific real-world event doesn't mean no problems," he said.

Miami-Dade provides an online list of products it has certified. Go to www.miamidade.gov. Search for "Approved products."

Products draw strength from Miami-Dade's lessons 05/16/08 [Last modified: Wednesday, May 21, 2008 2:36pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Study: Tampa Bay a top market for homebuyers on the move

    Real Estate

    The Tampa Bay area is among the top markets for homebuyers who are likely to move in the next few months, ATTOM Data Solutions says.

    The Tampa Bay area is among the top markets for homebuyers who are likely to move in the next few months, a survey found.
[Associated Press file photo]
  2. Tampa lawyer Fred Ridley to be new chairman of Augusta National, Masters' home (w/ video)

    Golf

    AUGUSTA, Ga. — Fred Ridley first came to Augusta National to compete in the 1976 Masters as the U.S. Amateur champion, and he played the opening round in the traditional pairing with the defending champion, Jack Nicklaus.

  3. Rays send down Chase Whitley, Andrew Kittredge; add Chih-Wei Hu, acitvate Alex Cobb

    Blogs

    After having to cover more than five innings following a short start by Austin Pruitt, the Rays shuffled their bullpen following Wednesday's game, sending down RHPs Chase Whitley and Andrew Kittredge,

    The Kittredge move was expected, as he was summoned to add depth to the pen Wednesday in advance of RHP Alex …

  4. MLB commissioner Rob Manfred moves closer to wanting a decision on Rays stadium

    The Heater

    ST. PETERSBURG — Major League Baseball commissioner Rob Manfred called Wednesday for urgency from Tampa Bay area government leaders to prioritize and move quicker on plans for a new Rays stadium.

    MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred talks with reporters at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Fla. on Wednesday, Aug. 23, 2017.
  5. Six home runs doom Rays in loss to Blue Jays (w/video)

    The Heater

    ST. PETERSBURG — A curve that didn't bounce was the difference Wednesday as the Rays lost 7-6 to the Blue Jays in front of 8,264, the smallest Tropicana field crowd since Sept. 5, 2006.

    Tampa Bay Rays shortstop Adeiny Hechavarria (11) greets center fielder Kevin Kiermaier (39) at the plate after his two run home run in the third inning of the game between the Toronto Blue Jays and the Tampa Bay Rays at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Fla. on Wednesday, Aug. 23, 2017.