4 U.S. soldiers killed in south Afghanistan

KABUL, Afghanistan — A bomb killed four U.S. soldiers in southern Afghanistan on Sunday, American and Afghan officials said. They were the latest casualties in a 12-year conflict that shows no signs of slowing down despite a drawdown in foreign forces.

The U.S.-led international military coalition said four of its service members were killed in the south, and a military official confirmed all were Americans killed by an "improvised explosive device."

Their deaths bring the toll among foreign forces to 132 this year, of which 102 are from the United States. At least 2,146 members of the U.S. military have died in Afghanistan as a result of the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, according to an Associated Press count. They are part of a total of nearly 3,390 coalition forces that have died during the conflict.

They were killed on the eve of the 12th anniversary of the Oct. 7, 2001, invasion, which led to an insurgency that shows no signs of abatement and a war that has become largely forgotten in the United States and among its coalition allies despite continued casualties suffered by their forces on the ground.

Javed Faisal, a spokesman for the governor of Kandahar, confirmed the four Americans were killed in the province by an IED. He had no further details.

Race for president

A slew of political heavyweights, along with the Afghan president's brother and a number of former warlords, will take part in next year's election for president. President Hamid Karzai is not entitled to run for a third consecutive term in the April 5 elections, but is expected to back at least one of the candidates — his former Foreign Minister Zalmai Rassoul, despite the fact that his businessman brother Qayyum Karzai is also running for president. By Sunday's deadline, 27 candidates had registered.

4 U.S. soldiers killed in south Afghanistan 10/06/13 [Last modified: Monday, October 7, 2013 12:11am]

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