56 killed in bombs, clashes in Iraq

56 killed in bombs, clashes in Iraq

Insurgents unleashed a new wave of attacks on Tuesday in Iraq, killing at least 49 people, officials said, the latest in a surge in violence across the country that has raised concerns over a return to sectarian bloodshed. Also, seven militants were killed. There was no claim of responsibility for the attacks, mostly car bombs in Shiite areas. Al-Qaida's Iraq branch, which has been gaining strength in recent months, frequently targets Shiites, security forces and civil servants in an effort to undermine the Shiite-led government in Baghdad. Iraq is weathering its deadliest outburst of violence since 2008, with more than 2,000 people killed since the start of April. The bloodshed appears to be largely the work of Sunni militants such as al-Qaida, feeding off Sunni discontent with the Shiite-led government. The bloodshed accelerated after a deadly April 23 crackdown by security forces on a Sunni protest in Hawija against the government.

Philadelphia

More surgery for girl who got new lungs

A 10-year-old girl who had two adult-lung transplants after her parents sued to change national rules regarding organ donations underwent surgery Tuesday to repair her diaphragm.

The operation performed at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia is expected to allow Sarah Murnaghan to breathe on her own. She has needed a breathing tube since the successful June 15 transplant because she suffered a partial paralysis of her diaphragm during that procedure.

Cuba

Several party leaders move on in shakeup

Cuban President Raul Castro on Tuesday announced the removal of former Parliament chief Ricardo Alarcon and several other leaders from the Communist Party's powerful Central Committee.

In comments broadcast on state-television, Castro made clear that those leaving the 118-strong committee had not made any mistakes or committed any crimes. He said they were moving on in the normal course of events. They range in age from 60 to 81.

New York

Two of Pluto's moons get names from myths

The International Astronomical Union on Tuesday announced names for two of Pluto moons, the fourth and fifth to be discovered.

Moon No. 4 is now Kerberos, after the many-headed dog that guarded the entrance to the underworld in Greek mythology. Moon No. 5 is Styx, named for the river that souls had to cross over to get to Hades, or the underworld, and the goddess who ruled over it.

In 2011 and 2012, Kerberos and Styx were discovered by a team led by Mark Showalter of the SETI Institute, which searches for extraterrestrial life, using the Hubble Space Telescope.

Elsewhere

Senegal: A special tribunal in Senegal has charged former Chad dictator Hissene Habre with war crimes, crimes against humanity and torture over atrocities committed during his rule, his lawyer said Tuesday.

Canada: Police have arrested and charged a man and woman with terrorism for attempting to leave pressure cooker bombs at British Columbia's provincial legislature in Victoria on Canada Day on Monday.

Times wires

56 killed in bombs, clashes in Iraq

07/02/13 [Last modified: Wednesday, July 3, 2013 1:19am]

© 2014 Tampa Bay Times

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...