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Benedict to be called 'emeritus pope,' wear white

VATICAN CITY — Two pontiffs, both wearing white, both called "pope" and living a few yards from each other, with the same key aide serving them.

The Vatican's announcement Tuesday that Pope Benedict XVI will be known as "emeritus pope" in his retirement, be called "Your Holiness" and continue to wear the white cassock associated with the papacy has fueled concerns about potential conflicts arising from the peculiar reality now facing the Catholic Church: having one reigning and one retired pope.

Benedict's title and what he will wear have been a major source of speculation since the 85-year-old pontiff stunned the world and announced he would resign Thursday, the first pope to do so in 600 years.

There has been good reason why popes haven't stepped down in past centuries, given the possibility for divided allegiances and even schism. But the Vatican insists that while the situation is certainly unique, no major conflicts will arise.

"According to the evolution of Catholic doctrine and mentality, there is only one pope. Clearly it's a new situation, but I don't think there will be problems," Giovanni Maria Vian, the editor of the Vatican newspaper L'Osservatore Romano, said in an interview.

Critics aren't so sure. Some Vatican-based cardinals have privately grumbled that it will make it more difficult for the next pope with Benedict still around.

Swiss theologian Hans Kueng, Benedict's onetime colleague-turned-critic, went further: "With Benedict XVI, there is a risk of a shadow pope who has abdicated but can still indirectly exert influence," he told Germany's Der Spiegel magazine last week.

The Vatican spokesman, the Rev. Federico Lombardi, said Tuesday that Benedict decided on his name and wardrobe in consultation with others, settling on "Your Holiness Benedict XVI" and either "emeritus pope" or "emeritus Roman pontiff." Lombardi said he didn't know why Benedict had decided to drop his other main title: bishop of Rome.

In the two weeks since Benedict's resignation announcement, Vatican officials had suggested he would likely resume wearing the traditional black garb of a cleric and would use the title "emeritus bishop of Rome" to avoid creating confusion with the future pope.

Adding to the concern is that Benedict's trusted secretary, Archbishop Georg Gaenswein, will be serving both pontiffs — living with Benedict at the monastery being converted for him inside Vatican grounds while keeping his day job as prefect of the new pope's household.

Workers sets up a stage for the media next to St. Peter’s Square ahead of Pope Benedict XVI’s last public audience today.

Associated Press

Workers sets up a stage for the media next to St. Peter’s Square ahead of Pope Benedict XVI’s last public audience today.

Benedict to be called 'emeritus pope,' wear white 02/26/13 [Last modified: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 12:58am]
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Photo Credit: Baja Ferries USA LLC