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Crimea's parliament pushes for independence

SIMFEROPOL, Ukraine — As the campaign increased for tension-filled Crimea to split off from Ukraine in a weekend referendum and join Russia, the region's Parliament said Tuesday that if voters approve the move it would first declare itself an independent state, a maneuver that could de-escalate the standoff between Moscow and the West.

The move would give Moscow the option of saying there is no need for Crimea to become part of Russia while keeping it firmly within its sphere of influence.

The dispute between Moscow and the West over Crimea is one of the most severe geopolitical crises in Europe since the end of the Cold War. Russian forces have secured control over the peninsula, but Ukraine's government and Western nations have denounced the referendum as illegitimate and strongly warned Russia against trying to annex Crimea.

Backers of voting to split off from Ukraine in Sunday's referendum say becoming part of Russia would return the Black Sea peninsula to its rightful home. Billboards around the regional capital proclaimed "Together with Russia" and street vendors were selling Russian flags.

But Russia's absorbing Crimea would only worsen tensions with the West, and the Parliament declaration could put the bid on hold, depending on the outcome of Russian President Vladimir Putin's bargaining with the West.

Crimea, where Russia maintains its Black Sea Fleet base, became the epicenter of tensions in Ukraine after President Viktor Yanukovych fled last month in the wake of months of protests and outbreaks of bloodshed.

Kiev-based political analyst Vadim Karasyov said the Crimean Parliament's move is "a message to the West that there is no talk about Russia incorporating Crimea."

"It's a tranquilizer for everybody — for the West and for many in Ukraine who are panicking," he said.

Karasyov speculated that Crimea could exist as a "quasi-legitimate" state, while Russia and the West negotiate.

Russia's Foreign Ministry later said in a statement that the Crimean Parliament's action was legitimate. "Russia will respect the results of Crimea's referendum that will be monitored by" observers from the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, the ministry said.

Men put up a poster for the Sunday referendum on whether Crimea should secede from Ukraine. Tuesday, Crimea’s Parliament said it would become an independent state first.

Getty Images

Men put up a poster for the Sunday referendum on whether Crimea should secede from Ukraine. Tuesday, Crimea’s Parliament said it would become an independent state first.

Crimea's parliament pushes for independence 03/11/14 [Last modified: Wednesday, March 12, 2014 12:09am]
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