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In China, tales of brutality in campaign against corruption

LILING, China — The local Chinese official remembers the panic he felt in Room 109. He had refused to confess to bribery he says he didn't commit, and his Communist Party interrogators were forcing his legs apart.

Zhou Wangyan heard his left thigh bone snap, with a loud "ka-cha." The sound nearly drowned out his howls of pain.

"My leg is broken," Zhou told the interrogators. According to Zhou, they ignored his pleas.

China's government is under strong pressure to fight rampant corruption in its ranks, faced with the anger of an increasingly prosperous, well-educated and Internet-savvy public. However, the Community Party's methods for extracting confessions expose its 85 million members and their families to the risk of abuse. Experts estimate at least several thousand people are secretly detained every year for weeks or months under an internal system that is separate from state justice.

In a rare display of public defiance, Zhou and three other party members in Hunan province in south-central China described to the Associated Press the months of abuse they endured less than two years ago, in separate cases, while in detention.

Zhou, land bureau director for the city of Liling, said he was deprived of sleep and food, nearly drowned, whipped with wires and forced to eat excrement. The others reported being turned into human punching bags, strung up by the wrists from high windows, or dragged along the floor, face down, by their feet.

All said they talked to the AP despite the risk of retaliation because they were victims of political vendettas and wanted to expose what had happened. Party officials denied any abuses had taken place.

Zhou's account is supported by medical records, prosecutor statements, party reports and a notice confirming that police failed to investigate the abuse. The AP also corroborated information through interviews with family and friends.

A Liling party official named Yi Dingfeng said provincial authorities were investigating the case. Local antigraft officials on a Hunan online forum in February 2012 denied Zhou was tortured.

Eighteen months after his leg broke, Zhou still limps on crutches.

"My time in shuanggui (detention) was tragic and brutal. It was a living hell," he said. "Those 184 days and five hours were not a life lived by a human. It was worse than being a pig or a dog."

The abuse of suspects in China is hardly limited to party members. And critics say President Xi Jinping is clamping down even more strongly on society than his predecessor, with increased detentions of people who push for political change, protest censorship and demand that officials disclose their wealth. However, little is known or reported about mistreatment within the party's obscure detention system for its own members.

Aside from Zhou, three others told the AP about their detention. Wang Qiuping, a party secretary in Ningyuan, said he was slapped often and forced to stand and kneel for hours during a detention of 313 days. His deputy Xiao Yifei told the AP he was hooded for more than a month and beaten by an interrogator who went by the nickname "Tang the Butcher." And Fan Qiqing, a contractor, said he was kicked, lashed and forced to take hallucinogenic drugs. A Ningyuan party official said the investigation involving the three men was carried out in a civilized manner and no one was tortured.

Zhou, then 47, was taken away from his office in July 2012 by three men from the party's local antigraft agency. He blames his detention on a party boss who bore him a grudge, later removed by the party in an investigation without reasons given.

Zhou spent most of his six months of detention at Qiaotoubao, known as a model center for anticorruption efforts. Zhou said he went on a tour of the facility in 2011 and thought it was "a safe environment" for detainees.

But when he was detained, Zhou's questioners punched him and dragged him on the floor by his hair, he said. They made him smoke 10 cigarettes at once with his face near lit coals. They pressed his face into water in a sink until he thought he was drowning. They slapped his face with shoes and broke four teeth.

It was in September 2012 that the interrogators broke his leg. In December 2012, Zhou finally caved. He signed a confession saying he had accepted $6,600, in bribes and wrote a resignation letter. He was freed in January 2013.

A year after his release, no action has been taken against his interrogators. Despite everything, he hopes for justice.

"I still believe that the Chinese Communist Party is a good ruling party," Zhou said.

In China, tales of brutality in campaign against corruption 03/09/14 [Last modified: Sunday, March 9, 2014 10:26pm]
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