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Iraqis vote in an election without foreign troops (w/video)

BAGHDAD — Iraq voted Wednesday in its first nationwide election since U.S. troops withdrew in 2011, with Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki confident of victory and even offering an olive branch to his critics by inviting them to join him in a governing coalition.

But his optimism will do little to conceal the turmoil and violence that have plagued Iraq in the eight years he has held office, with the looming threat of the country sliding deeper into sectarian bloodshed and risking a breakup.

"Here we are today, successfully holding the . . . election while no foreign troops exist on Iraqi soil. I call upon all the other groups to leave the past behind and start a new phase of good brotherly relations," said al-Maliki, who faces growing criticism over government corruption and persistent bloodshed as sectarian tensions threaten to push Iraq back toward the brink of civil war.

The election was held amid a massive security operation, with hundreds of thousands of troops and police deployed across the country to protect polling centers and voters.

Scattered attacks took place north and west of Baghdad, killing at least five people and wounding 16. Roadside bombs killed two women and two election workers in the northern town of Dibis.

Al-Maliki's State of Law bloc was widely expected to win the most seats in the 328-member parliament but fall short of a majority, according to analysts. That would allow al-Maliki to keep his post only if he can cobble together a coalition — a task that took nine months after the last election in 2010.

An Iraqi woman prepares to cast her vote at a polling center Wednesday in Baghdad. The election of a new Iraqi parliament was under way amid a massive security operation as the country slides deeper into sectarian violence.

Associated Press

An Iraqi woman prepares to cast her vote at a polling center Wednesday in Baghdad. The election of a new Iraqi parliament was under way amid a massive security operation as the country slides deeper into sectarian violence.

Iraqis vote in an election without foreign troops (w/video) 04/30/14 [Last modified: Wednesday, April 30, 2014 9:01pm]
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