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Leader of uprising sees long battle in Libya

Libya

Leader of uprising sees long battle

The former general who is leading an armed uprising in Libya said Tuesday that he would not negotiate with his rivals and would instead rely on force to achieve his objectives. "We see that confrontation is the solution," Khalifa Hifter said in a telephone interview with the Washington Post from his headquarters in the eastern city of Benghazi. "I do not think talks will work with them." On Friday, Hifter launched an offensive in Benghazi against Islamist militias that have been widely blamed for a string of assassinations. As least 70 people were killed and dozens injured in the most intense fighting since the revolt that deposed dictator Moammar Gadhafi three years ago. The assault was followed two days later by an attack on the national parliament in Tripoli by militias loyal to Hifter.

Ukraine

Mixed results in call for demonstrations

A plea by Ukraine's richest man for demonstrations against Russian-backed separatists met with a mixed response Tuesday as many of his own workers stayed on their jobs.

But many Ukrainians still saw the gesture by billionaire Rinat Akhmetov as a welcome, if symbolic, attempt to end the country's fraternal strife while European leaders searched for diplomatic solutions to the crisis before Sunday's presidential election.

Akhmetov asked his 300,000 employees to join a noon peace rally against the separatist movement that, he said, could wreck eastern Ukraine's economy. The call followed Akhmetov's decision last week to form worker patrols to help police restore order in Mariupol, an industrial port city in southeastern Ukraine.

Los Angeles

Police say actor told of shooting his wife

Actor Michael Jace, who played a police officer on the hit TV show The Shield, was arrested Tuesday after authorities said he called 911 and said he had shot his wife.

Detectives were investigating whether the couple's financial problems or other marital difficulties played a role in the killing that police said occurred during an argument Monday night while the couple's two sons, both under 10, were in the house.

Bosnia

Drowned livestock a new Balkan threat

A new calamity emerged Tuesday in the flood-hit Balkans as rescue workers battled overflowing rivers — and were confronted by wastelands of drowned livestock.

As the rainfall stopped and temperatures rose, the withdrawing floodwaters revealed a harrowing sight: thousands of dead cows, pigs, sheep, dogs and other animals left behind as their panicked owners fled.

"There are tons of dead animals that we must dispose of," Serbian Prime Minister Aleksandar Vucic told a government meeting.

The record flooding in Bosnia, Serbia and Croatia in the past week has forced half a million people from their homes and led to at least 44 deaths.

Elsewhere

Thailand: Thousands of antigovernment protesters ignored the declaration of martial law on Tuesday, dancing and singing in Bangkok as questions intensified about the intentions of the military, which imposed the emergency decree without giving civilian officials any advance notice.

South Africa: Oscar Pistorius will start psychiatric evaluations at a government institution next week, a judge ruled Tuesday as she postponed the star athlete's murder trial in the killing of his girlfriend until June 30.

Times wires

Leader of uprising sees long battle in Libya 05/20/14 [Last modified: Wednesday, May 21, 2014 12:01am]
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