Monday, November 20, 2017
News Roundup

Morsi supporters also take to streets, causing dueling protests

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CAIRO — Supporters of Mohammed Morsi rallied on behalf of the ousted president Friday in their biggest demonstrations since he was removed from office, part of a strategy to get him reinstated by using the same means that forced his removal: mass protests.

"Ir-hal!" they chanted — leave, in Arabic — the same word Morsi's opponents had yelled in urging the president to resign. This time, the chant was directed at Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, the minister of defense and the head of the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, who announced Morsi's ousting July 3.

Just as Morsi's opponents refused to work with his government, the Muslim Brotherhood, through which Morsi rose to prominence, has rejected entreaties from new Prime Minister Hazem el-Beblawi to join his Cabinet. Morsi's opponents now are accusing the militarily installed transitional president, Adly Mansour, of grabbing power with an unpopular declaration that gives him near dictatorial powers. It was the same charge leveled against Morsi last fall.

"We are using the same weapon they are using against us, but the difference between them and us is that we are using it in a peaceful manner," said Naguib el Shanenwy, a 30-year-old imam who marched in support of Morsi. "We did not believe in democracy in the first place but we agreed to play democracy as they did and we won."

The likelihood that Egypt's political battles would continue to play out in competing street demonstrations, perhaps for months, filled analysts with despair.

"I'm pessimistic," said Frederic Wehry, a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, a nonpartisan think tank in Washington. "This is going to get worse before it gets better." He predicted that the Brotherhood "is not going to go quietly."

Wehry also predicted that young secular revolutionaries who formed the Tamarod, or rebel, movement to demand Morsi's resignation and who have backed the military overthrow of a democratically elected leader would likely rue the decision. The Tamarod movement "made a Faustian bargain" with the military "that they'll come to regret," Wehry said.

U.S. urges release

The United States joined Germany on Friday in calling for the military to release Morsi, who hasn't been seen since a middle-of-the-night speech hours before his overthrow was announced. The military has said only that Morsi is being held for his own safety. Pro-Morsi demonstrators believe he's under arrest at the headquarters of the Republican Guard, whose troops ordinarily protect the president.

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