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Noodles: Friend or foe? S. Koreans defend diet

SEOUL, South Korea — Kim Min Koo has an easy reply to new American research that hits South Korea where it hurts — in the noodles. Drunk and hungry just after dawn, he rips the lid off a bowl of his beloved fast food, wobbling on his feet but still defiant over a report that links instant noodles to health hazards.

"There's no way any study is going to stop me from eating this," says Kim, his red face beaded with sweat as he adds hot water to his noodles in a Seoul convenience store. His mouth waters, wooden chopsticks poised above the softening strands, his glasses fogged by steam. At last, he spears a slippery heap, lets forth a mighty, noodle-cooling blast of air and starts slurping.

"This is the best moment — the first bite," Kim, a freelance film editor who indulges about five times a week, says between gulps. "The taste, the smell, the chewiness — it's just perfect."

Instant noodles carry a broke college student aura in America, but they are an essential, even passionate, part of life for many in South Korea and across Asia. Hence, the emotional heartburn caused by a Baylor Heart and Vascular Hospital study in the United States that linked instant noodles consumption by South Koreans to some risks for heart disease.

The study has provoked feelings of wounded pride, mild guilt, stubborn resistance, even nationalism among South Koreans, who eat more instant noodles per capita than anyone in the world. Many of those interviewed vowed, like Kim, not to quit.

The heated reaction is partly explained by the omnipresence here of instant noodles, which, for South Koreans, usually mean the spicy, salty "ramyeon" that costs less than a dollar a package.

The U.S. study was based on South Korean surveys from 2007 to 2009 of more than 10,700 adults aged 19-64, about half of them women. It found that people who ate a diet rich in meat, soda, fried food and fast foods, including instant noodles, were associated with an increase in abdominal obesity and LDL, or "bad," cholesterol. Eating instant noodles more than twice a week was associated with a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome, another heart risk factor, in women, but not in men.

For many Asians, instant noodles, also known as “ramyeon,” are a dietary staple as Han Seung Youn, 36, shows in Seoul, South Korea.

Associated Press

For many Asians, instant noodles, also known as “ramyeon,” are a dietary staple as Han Seung Youn, 36, shows in Seoul, South Korea.

Noodles: Friend or foe? S. Koreans defend diet 08/21/14 [Last modified: Thursday, August 21, 2014 10:28pm]
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