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Pakistan's Sharif declares election victory

ISLAMABAD — Former Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif declared victory following a historic election marred by violence Saturday, a remarkable comeback for a leader once toppled in a military coup and sent into exile.

Sharif, 63, who has twice served as premier, touted his success after unofficial, partial vote counts showed his Pakistan Muslim League-N party with an overwhelming lead. The party weathered a strong campaign by former cricket star Imran Khan that energized young people.

Sharif expressed a desire to work with all parties to solve the country's problems in a victory speech given to his supporters in the eastern city of Lahore as his lead in the national election became apparent based on vote counts announced by Pakistan state TV.

The results, which need to be officially confirmed, indicated Sharif's party has an overwhelming lead but would fall short of winning a majority of the 272 directly elected national assembly seats. That means he would have to put together a ruling coalition.

"I appeal to all to come sit with me at the table so that this nation can get rid of this curse of power cuts, inflation and unemployment," Sharif said, as his supporters clapped, cheered and danced in the streets.

Despite attacks against candidates, party workers and voters that killed 29 people Saturday, Pakistanis turned out in large numbers to elect the national and provincial assemblies.

The high participation was a sign of Pakistanis' desire for change after years of hardship under the outgoing government, and it offered a sharp rebuke to Taliban militants and others who have tried to derail the election with attacks that have killed more than 150 people in recent weeks.

"Our country is in big trouble," said Mohammad Ali, a shopkeeper who voted in Lahore. "Our people are jobless. Our business is badly affected. We are dying every day."

The vote marked the first time a civilian government has completed its full five-year term and transferred power in democratic elections in a country that has experienced three coups and constant political instability since it was established in 1947.

The election was being watched closely by the United States, which relies on the nuclear-armed country of 180 million for help fighting Islamic militants and negotiating an end to the war in neighboring Afghanistan.

Passion and energy were seen throughout Pakistan, as millions of people headed to the polls, waving flags and chanting slogans in support of their party. Some were young, first-time voters and others elderly Pakistanis who leaned on canes or friends for support as they dropped their vote in the ballot box.

Bilal Masih went to a polling station in the central city of Multan dressed in his wedding attire, saying his bride could wait until he voted. He decorated his wedding car with flowers and a stuffed tiger, the symbol of the Pakistan Muslim League-N party he supports.

"I thought that this was my national duty," said Masih, who was wearing a white and red turban and had garlands of flowers around his neck.

Many Pakistanis seemed determined to cast their ballots despite gun and bomb attacks.

"Yes, there are fears. But what should we do?" said Ali Khan, who was waiting to vote in the northwestern city of Peshawar, where one of the blasts took place. "Either we sit in our house and let the terrorism go on, or we come out of our homes, cast our vote, and bring in a government that can solve this problem of terrorism."

Deaths

As of Saturday, 2,083 U.S. troops have died in the war in Afghanistan. Identifications as reported by the U.S. military and not previously published:

Army 1st Lt. Brandon J. Landrum, 26, Lawton, Okla.; improvised explosive device May 4; Maiwand

Army Staff Sgt. Francis G. Phillips IV, 28, Meridian, N.Y.; improvised explosive device May 4; Maiwand

Army Spc. Kevin Cardoza, 19, Mercedes, Texas; improvised explosive device May 4; Maiwand

Army Spc. Thomas P. Murach, 22, Meridian, Idaho; improvised explosive device May 4; Maiwand

Army Spc. Brandon J. Prescott, 24, Bend, Ore.; improvised explosive device May 4; Maiwand

Marine Staff Sgt. Eric D. Christian, 39, Warwick, N.Y.; combat operations May 4; Farah province

Marine Cpl. David M. Sonka, 23, Parker, Colo.; combat operations May 4; Farah province

Pakistan's Sharif declares election victory 05/11/13 [Last modified: Saturday, May 11, 2013 11:43pm]
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