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Street protesters defy crackdown in Sudan

Sudan

Street protesters defy crackdown

Security forces fired at Sudanese protesters with bullets and tear gas Friday as thousands took to the streets despite a fierce crackdown that rights groups say has killed dozens of people this week. The regime of President Omar al-Bashir is trying to keep public anger over fuel price hikes from turning into an Arab Spring-style uprising against his 24-year rule. The marches in one of the world's poorest countries — where nearly 50 percent of population lives below the poverty line — have turned into the biggest domestic challenge yet faced by al-Bashir, who has so far been spared the sort of antiauthoritarian popular revolts seen around the Arab world. The unrest began Sunday in the town of Wad Madani when the government cut subsidies on fuel, causing prices to leap.

Kenya

Official says troops caused mall collapse

Kenya's military caused the collapse of three floors of the Westgate mall in the deadly terrorist siege in Nairobi, a top-ranking official disclosed Friday, while the government urged patience with the pace of an investigation that has left key questions unanswered. The official spoke to the Associated Press on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to divulge sensitive information.

Seven days after 67 people were killed in the attack on the upscale shopping center, there is still no clear word on the fate of dozens who have been reported missing and no details on the terrorists who carried it out.

The account of the roof collapse raises the possibility that the military may have caused the death of hostages in its rescue attempt. An undisclosed number of people are feared to be buried in the rubble.

Irving, Texas

Bush active again after heart procedure

Former President George W. Bush says he's feeling "pretty good" after undergoing a heart procedure last month and is able to go mountain biking and play golf.

"I'm a little more risk averse on the mountain bike, but I'm exercising," Bush said on Friday after kicking off the competitive portion of his golf tournament for military members wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan. This is the third year for the event.

On Aug. 6, Bush had a stent inserted after a blockage was discovered in an artery during his annual physical.

Cambridge, Mass.

Harvard honors girl shot by Taliban

A Pakistani girl who survived an assassination attempt by the Taliban has been honored as Harvard University's humanitarian of the year.

Malala Yousafzai, an outspoken proponent for girls' education, was at Harvard on Friday to accept the 2013 Peter J. Gomes Humanitarian Award. Harvard president Drew Gilpin Faust said she was pleased to welcome Malala because of their shared interest in education.

Malala, 16, was shot in the head last October.

Elsewhere

Washington: A former high-ranking official with the Environmental Protection Agency, John C. Beale, 64, pleaded guilty Friday to stealing nearly $900,000 from the agency over 13 years by failing to show up for work while falsely claiming to be working for the CIA and by filing bogus expenses.

Pakistan: Vital relief aid destined for a remote, earthquake stricken region in Pakistan reached desperate villagers only slowly on Friday, as insurgents attacked troops distributing it for a third day.

Russia: Greenpeace said Friday it will appeal Russian court rulings that sent its activists to jail for a protest at an offshore drilling platform in the arctic.

Anchorage, Alaska: Apple has disabled driving directions to the Fairbanks International Airport after a glitch in its maps app guided drivers to the edge of a runway instead of a terminal, airport spokeswoman Angie Spear said Friday.

Associated Press

Street protesters defy crackdown in Sudan 09/27/13 [Last modified: Saturday, September 28, 2013 12:46am]
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