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Tunisia passes progressive constitution

Members of the Tunisian National Constitutional Assembly celebrate Sunday after the adoption of a new constitution. The country overthrew its dictator in 2011.

European Pressphoto Agency

Members of the Tunisian National Constitutional Assembly celebrate Sunday after the adoption of a new constitution. The country overthrew its dictator in 2011.

TUNIS, Tunisia — After decades of dictatorship and two years of arguments and compromises, Tunisia's National Constitutional Assembly on Sunday approved a constitution that lays the foundations for a new democracy.

The document is groundbreaking as one of the most progressive constitutions in the Arab world. It passed by 200 votes out of 216 in the Muslim Mediterranean country that inspired uprisings across the region after overthrowing a dictator in 2011.

"This constitution, without being perfect, is one of consensus," assembly speaker Mustapha Ben Jaafar said after the vote. "We had today a new rendezvous with history to build a democracy founded on rights and equality."

The constitution sets out to make the North African country of 11 million people a democracy, with a civil state whose laws are not based on Islamic law, unlike many other Arab constitutions. An entire chapter of the document, some 28 articles, is dedicated to protecting citizens' rights, including protection from torture, the right to due process, and freedom of worship. It guarantees equality between men and women before the law and the state commits itself to protecting women's rights.

Tunisians hope its care in drafting the constitution makes a difference in returning stability to the country and reassuring investors and allies such as the United States.

"We needed time to get this constitution as it is today," said Amira Yahyaoui, who has closely followed the assembly's activities with her monitoring group Bawsala. "Clearly, writing this constitution to do a real transformation of the minds of people needed time and I absolutely don't regret these two years and I am happy we had time to discuss and think about all the arguments."

Tunisia passes progressive constitution 01/26/14 [Last modified: Sunday, January 26, 2014 10:14pm]
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