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Without radar, missile may not have identified jet

LONDON — If Ukrainian rebels shot down the Malaysian jetliner, killing 298 people, it may have been because they didn't have the right systems in place to distinguish between military and civilian aircraft, experts said Saturday.

American officials said Friday that they believe the Boeing 777-200 was brought down by an SA-11 missile fired from an area of eastern Ukraine controlled by pro-Russian separatists. U.N. Ambassador Samantha Power said the Russians might have provided technical help to the rebels to operate the systems.

But to function correctly, an SA-11 launcher, also known as a Buk, is supposed to be connected to a central radar command — as opposed to acting alone — to be certain of exactly what kind of aircraft it is shooting at.

From the information that has come to light so far, the rebels don't appear to have such systems, said Pavel Felgenhauer, a respected defense columnist for Novaya Gazeta, a Moscow-based newspaper known for its critical coverage of Russian affairs.

"They could easily make a tragic mistake and shoot down a passenger plane when indeed they wanted to shoot down a Ukrainian transport plane," he said.

A Russian SA-11 missile launcher is displayed at a military show in Zhukovsky, outside Moscow. If Ukrainian rebels shot down the Malaysian jetliner, killing 298 people, with an SA-11, it may have been because they didn’t have the right systems in place to distinguish between military and civilian aircraft, experts said Saturday.

Associated Press (2010)

A Russian SA-11 missile launcher is displayed at a military show in Zhukovsky, outside Moscow. If Ukrainian rebels shot down the Malaysian jetliner, killing 298 people, with an SA-11, it may have been because they didn’t have the right systems in place to distinguish between military and civilian aircraft, experts said Saturday.

Without radar, missile may not have identified jet 07/19/14 [Last modified: Saturday, July 19, 2014 11:27pm]
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