Friday, April 20, 2018
Opinion

BP is playing a cynical game over spill (w/video)

Four years after the largest offshore oil disaster in U.S. history, scientists are still trying to come to terms with the toll that the Deepwater Horizon tragedy wreaked on the birds, sea life, waters and habitats of the Gulf of Mexico. Multitudes of creatures and habitats were wiped out — and continue to suffer — but outrageously, environmental restoration has barely even begun.

And BP — having already pleaded guilty to criminal negligence — is hard at work delaying justice.

BP's strategy is clear: Postpone the inevitable payments for their environmental negligence and instead try to convince you that they're being fleeced by two-bit Louisiana shysters. You've seen those full-page ads, right?

This is a cynical calculation about the time value of money — an $18 billion judgment against BP that happens two years from now is cheaper than $18 billion if it were awarded today. BP has nothing but contempt for the judge and the court in New Orleans. The U.S. District Court Judge Carl Barbier has called BP's continuous attacks on his rulings "deeply disappointing."

Instead of trying to fix what it broke, BP is spending the fourth anniversary of the spill pulling every legal trick it can to drag out the court proceedings that will determine how much it has to pay to repair the environmental harm it caused. BP's lawyers have played a major role in delaying the final phase of federal court hearings in New Orleans until 2015.

That is not only shameful, it vividly demonstrates the company's utter disregard for the urgency of making reparations to the damaged environment and the birds, wildlife, sea creatures and people that depend on it.

The Deepwater Horizon oil disaster is the largest violation of the Clean Water Act in the history of the nation: an estimated 170 million gallons of oil spewed into the Gulf of Mexico. That's roughly 15 times the amount dumped into Alaska's Prince William Sound when the Exxon Valdez slammed into a reef 25 years ago.

In the aftermath of the spill, Congress acted expeditiously to establish the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council — made up of representatives of five states and six federal agencies — to distribute and oversee the BP Clean Water Act penalty funds in the five Gulf States. But now BP has tied the council's hands. The groundwork has been laid for one of the most significant environmental restoration efforts in modern times. The most ambitious restoration plans cannot begin until BP is held accountable and pays under the Clean Water Act, which was created to penalize negligent companies for precisely the kind of disaster as the Deepwater Horizon spill.

Audubon biologist Melanie Driscoll recently told veteran Louisiana reporter Bob Marshall that the death toll for birds is still poorly understood, but that the number could be in the six figures. American White Pelicans have carried BP's oil and Corexit oil dispersant on their feathers all the way to Minnesota, where it contaminated their eggs. Marine biologists are alarmed too.

BP has agreed to pay reparations to the families of the 11 men who died in the explosion, it has paid off some businesses and individuals for some of their economic loss, and it paid for the immediate cleanup of the visible oil spilled, as it was required to do under U.S. law. It has pleaded guilty to 14 criminal counts ranging from lying to felony manslaughter. But BP has not contributed a dime for its violation of the Clean Water Act, the money most vital to environmental reparations.

David Yarnold is the president and CEO of the National Audubon Society.

Comments
Editorial: New Cuba president is chance for new start

Editorial: New Cuba president is chance for new start

For all the symbolism, Raul Castro’s handoff of the Cuban presidency this week amounts to less than meets the eye even if his handpicked successor, the Communist Party functionary Miguel Diaz-Canel Bermudez, is the first person not named Castro to le...
Updated: 7 hours ago

Editorial: A missed chance for open primary elections

The Florida Constitution Revision Commission did a lot of things wrong this week by combining unrelated or unpalatable provisions into single amendments that will appear on the November ballot. It also wasted an opportunity to do one thing right. The...
Updated: 8 hours ago
Editorial: When they visit Nature’s Classroom, kids are right where they belong

Editorial: When they visit Nature’s Classroom, kids are right where they belong

The Hillsborough school district planted a fruitful seed with the opening of Nature’s Classroom five decades ago on the cypress-lined banks of the Hillsborough River northeast of Tampa. • The lessons taught there to some 17,000 sixth graders each yea...
Published: 04/20/18

Editorial: Equality pays off on Southwest Flight 1380

The passengers of Southwest Flight 1380 can be thankful that, 33 years ago, the U.S. Navy took the lead on equal opportunity.Capt. Tammie Jo Shults was piloting the flight from New York to Dallas on Tuesday when an engine exploded, blowing out a wind...
Updated: 8 hours ago
Editorial: Why single-member districts would be bad for Hillsborough commission

Editorial: Why single-member districts would be bad for Hillsborough commission

Anyone looking to make Hillsborough County government bigger, costlier, more dysfunctional and less of a regional force should love the idea that Commissioner Sandy Murman rolled out this week. She proposes enlarging the seven-member board to nine, e...
Published: 04/19/18
Updated: 04/20/18
Editorial: Improving foster care in Hillsborough

Editorial: Improving foster care in Hillsborough

A new foster care provider in Hillsborough County is poised to take over operations in May, only months after its predecessor was fired for what was alleged to be a pattern of failing to supervise at-risk children in its care. Many of the case manage...
Published: 04/18/18

Another voice: Back to postal reform

President Donald Trump is angry at Amazon for, in his tweeted words, "costing the United States Post Office massive amounts of money for being their Delivery Boy." Yet in more recent days, Trump has at least channeled his feelings in what could prove...
Published: 04/17/18
Updated: 04/18/18
Editorial: Congress should protect independence of special counsel

Editorial: Congress should protect independence of special counsel

A bipartisan Senate bill clarifying that only the attorney general or a high-ranking designee could remove a special prosecutor would send an important message amid President Donald Trump’s attacks on the investigation into Russia’s inter...
Published: 04/16/18
Updated: 04/17/18
Editorial: Don’t fall for Constitution Revision Commission’s tricks

Editorial: Don’t fall for Constitution Revision Commission’s tricks

The Florida Constitution Revision Commission has wasted months as a politically motivated scam masquerading as a high-minded effort to ask voters to improve the state’s fundamental document. The commission on Monday added amendments to the Nove...
Published: 04/16/18
Editorial: Redner’s court win on medical marijuana sends message

Editorial: Redner’s court win on medical marijuana sends message

Florida regulators have done far too little to make voter-approved medical marijuana widely available for patients suffering from chronic illnesses. A circuit court judge in Tallahassee ruled last week there is a price for that obstruction, finding t...
Published: 04/15/18
Updated: 04/16/18