Friday, September 21, 2018
Opinion

Kickstarter, Indiegogo help local projects

Filmmaker Spike Lee did it. So have countless other nameless groups in search of funding to launch worthy art and film projects.

Crowdfunding is growing in popularity and two of the top sites are kickstarter.com and indiegogo.com.

Kickstarter is an all-or-nothing fund: Reach the goal, the money's yours, but fall short and all the money goes back to the folks who tried to offer help. On the other hand, indiegogo is a "keep it all" fund — even if the project falls short of the goal.

Here in the Sunshine City, I learned of at least three projects with looming deadlines that are worthy of consideration.

The projects' origins stem from members of the city's growing arts community.

• The most ambitious project belongs to partners Scott Durfee and George Medeiros. This month, they launched a campaign with a $10,000 goal on kickstarter.com.

Their company, Spathose, was invited to the American Craft Retailers Expo trade show in January in Orlando.

Though they're excited about the opportunity to showcase their brand, the fees associated with pulling everything together can be costly. So launching the project on kickstarter.com was their best option.

Spathose creates unique, abstract designs with an industrial edge. Their artwork and fashion accessories have been on display at the Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg and other art venues throughout the bay area.

They now want to branch out and expand the brand in the accessories industry and to show, for the first time, a line of unique wearable sculpture at ACRE.

Broken Lives Illustrated is a collaborative project by filmmaker Nick Brengle and artist Jake Troyli.

The project takes a snapshot of the lives of 12 homeless people in St. Petersburg.

The two met years ago at Pinellas Park High School, where Troyli was a basketball star and Brengle was the announcer at the games.

They reconnected in August at the opening of Troyli's art exhibit at the [email protected] and agreed to collaborate on a project.

"In the essence, we just want to show the beauty in these people," Troyli said. "Even with broken lives, there is beauty."

The project will include a multimedia presentation that features the homeless as well as a time lapse of Troyli sketching his subjects. That work will later be on display and will come to life as the homeless tell their stories.

Some of the money will actually help the homeless. Brengle and Troyli have reached out to Hannah's Homeless, a nonprofit that focuses on providing food, clothing, blankets and needed hygiene items to homeless people in and around St. Petersburg.

• One project that won't be sweating as a deadline looms is Handmade Sculptural & Functional Pottery: for artful living and artful giving.

Wendy Durand's artwork has been accepted into the Buyer's Market of American Craft set for January in Philadelphia.

"It's the premier trade show for wholesaling any type of craft. The show draws 2,000 designers and galleries with about 5,000 representatives from those galleries. It could really boost your exposure," Durand said.

According to Durand, the difference between selling pieces at the studio and taking orders at a trade show are like night and day. Buyers purchase or order the artwork at the show — so a vendor can return home with a huge work order.

Durand said she's humbled by the outpouring of support.

"People in the community have been so generous," she said.

"Some of the backers are people I know,'' Durand said. "I've had artists who gave me a dollar, saying they wish they could give more. The money is important because I need it to get there, but it's really about the community."

There's still time to help each of the projects.

• • •

If you've had a hankering for an empanada or your supply of Tupelo honey is running low, never fear: Saturday Morning Market returns this week in downtown St. Petersburg.

It's hard to imagine that the Saturday Morning Market — the largest farmers market in the state — has been around for more than a decade. In its 11th year, the market runs from Saturday through May 31.

What started out as an urban village of nearly 30 vendors in 2002, has grown to 200 vendors rotating through 130 spaces.

A new addition this year: A new vendor will be flying in fresh truffles from Italy. The market is held each Saturday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the parking lot at Progress Energy Park, First Street at First Avenue SE, the home of Al Lang Field.

Visit saturdaymorningmarket.com.

Sandra J. Gadsden can be reached at [email protected] or (727) 893-8874. Follow @StPeteSandi on Twitter.

Comments
Editorial: Florida needs uniform standards for voting by mail

Editorial: Florida needs uniform standards for voting by mail

Vote by mail has been a stunning success in Florida, increasing turnout and making it easy and convenient to cast a ballot with time to research and reflect. But a new study shows that mail ballots cast by African-American, Hispanic or younger voters...
Updated: 8 hours ago
Editorial: Borrowers need protection from Marlin Financial

Editorial: Borrowers need protection from Marlin Financial

State and federal lending regulations exist to protect consumers from being surprised — and overwhelmed — by ballooning debt. Marlin Financial, a shadowy auto lender doing business around Florida, seems to be skirting those protections ...
Published: 09/21/18
Editorial: Putnam hire stinks of patronage, secrecy

Editorial: Putnam hire stinks of patronage, secrecy

In addition to a lesson on political patronage, Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam needs a refresher on the particulars of state public records law.In January 2017, Putnam hired the 27-year-old son of a former Publix executive to a high-pay...
Published: 09/20/18
Editorial: Investigate first, then hold Kavanaugh confirmation vote

Editorial: Investigate first, then hold Kavanaugh confirmation vote

There should be a timely investigation of the allegation of sexual assault against Judge Brett Kavanaugh before senators hear from him and his accuser, let alone vote on whether they should confirm his nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court. The proces...
Published: 09/20/18
Editorial: Immigrants help to make America great

Editorial: Immigrants help to make America great

The heated debate on immigration could benefit from some more facts, which the U.S. Census has helpfully provided. And the facts show that rather than building walls, the United States would do far better to keep opening doors to legal immigrants. Th...
Published: 09/19/18
Updated: 09/20/18
Editorial: FDA acts to keep e-cigarettes from kids

Editorial: FDA acts to keep e-cigarettes from kids

The federal Food and Drug Administration is bringing important scrutiny to the increasing use of e-cigarettes, requiring companies that make and sell them to show they are keeping their products away from minors. Vaping is the new front in the nation...
Published: 09/18/18

Tuesday’s letters: Honor Flight restored my faith in America

Dogs are the best | Letter, Sept. 15Honor Flight restored my faith in AmericaJust as I was about to give up on our country due to divisiveness and and the divisions among its people and politicians, my pride was restored. As a member of the recen...
Published: 09/17/18
Updated: 09/19/18
Editorial: Senate should delay vote on Kavanaugh

Editorial: Senate should delay vote on Kavanaugh

The Senate and the nation needs to hear more about the sexual assault allegation against U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. Setting aside Kavanaugh's judicial record, his political past and the hyper-partisan divide over his nomination, a no...
Published: 09/17/18
Editorial: Tampa council has another chance to show it takes Stovall House changes seriously

Editorial: Tampa council has another chance to show it takes Stovall House changes seriously

The Tampa City Council has yet to hear a compelling reason to allow a private social club in a residential neighborhood off Bayshore Boulevard, and a final meeting on the matter scheduled for Thursday offers the council a chance to show the diligence...
Published: 09/14/18
Editorial: Focus on Hurricane Florence, not defending poor response in Puerto Rico

Editorial: Focus on Hurricane Florence, not defending poor response in Puerto Rico

Hurricane Florence began lashing down on the Carolinas Thursday and was expected to make landfall early Friday, washing over dunes, downing trees and power lines and putting some 10 million people in the path of a potentially catastrophic storm. Flor...
Published: 09/13/18