Tuesday, December 12, 2017
Opinion

With faithful fired up, Obama hard to beat

CHARLOTTE, N.C.

It is just about the right time for irresponsibly early predictions, so here is mine:

If the Democrats can maintain the enthusiasm for three days that we have seen thus far in their convention, Mitt Romney will have a serious problem in attaining the presidency. He will need at least three things:

1. A superlative performance in all three of his debates with Barack Obama in October.

2. An extraordinary get-out-the-vote effort on Election Day.

3. An effective voter suppression campaign to keep minorities and young people from casting their ballots.

Am I making too much of the spirit generated by the speeches at the Democratic convention? Have I been swept away?

I don't think so, but if I have been swept away, voters have been, too.

I am not talking about undecided voters. This election is about base voters: bringing them back to the party if they have drifted away, getting them fired up, getting them working to bring out the vote and getting them voting.

There have been many stories about how a lot of people who were enthusiastic about the inspirational, almost messianic, campaign of Obama in 2008 have grown disappointed and disaffected today.

I think those stories are true. We have not reached the Promised Land. It took Moses 40 years of wandering just to catch a glimpse of it, and Obama has not brought us there in three and a half.

His biggest problem is not bad economic numbers. I believe bad economic numbers — barring a calamity — have been "baked into the cake." Voters have already come to grips with the fact that unemployment will not be low by Nov. 6 and are looking for a candidate to trust, not one to produce a magic job-creating wand.

Obama's biggest problem has been a genuine falloff in enthusiasm for him, his rhetoric and his promises. You get one chance to make a first impression. Has Obama blown that chance?

The Democratic convention says — bellows — no. The level of enthusiasm here has been noticeably higher than the level of enthusiasm at the Republican convention in Tampa. Ann Romney gave a good speech, but the one moment that voters will remember from that convention is the Clint Eastwood "ramble" that was as empty as the chair he stood next to.

The speeches at the Democratic convention have been impassioned and stirring and filled with moments that linger.

"The presidency doesn't change who you are, it reveals who you are," Michelle Obama said.

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick made himself into a national figure with his speech. "I, for one, will not stand by and let (Obama) be bullied out of office, and neither should you!" Patrick roared. "It's time for the Democrats to grow a backbone and stand up for what we believe in!"

San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro said in his keynote address: "In the end, the American dream is not a sprint, or even a marathon, but a relay. Our families don't always cross the finish line in the span of one generation. But each generation passes on to the next the fruits of their labor."

Does it matter? We live, after all, in a visual and electronic age in which political speeches appear to be mere relics.

I called one of the greatest speechwriters of modern times, Bob Shrum, who wrote the best speech I ever heard in person, Ted Kennedy's convention speech of 1980 that ended with the unforgettable: "… the work goes on, the cause endures, the hope still lives, and the dream shall never die."

"Words have power," Shrum told me. "These convention speakers want to reach people not just intellectually, but actually move them."

"Words can be visual," Shrum said. "When Michelle Obama said, 'When you walk through that door of opportunity, you don't slam it shut behind you,' you just didn't hear those words, you could see that image."

Shrum concluded: "Words are a useful and persuasive engine. Eloquence has power."

And if Obama ever needed eloquence, not just his own, but that of others, the time is now.

Roger Simon is POLITICO's chief political columnist. © 2012 Politico

Comments
Editorial: Tax cuts arenít worth harm to Tampa Bay

Editorial: Tax cuts arenít worth harm to Tampa Bay

As congressional negotiators hammer out the details on an enormous, unnecessary tax cut, the potential negative impact on Tampa Bay and Florida is becoming clearer. The harmful consequences stretch far beyond adding more than $1.4 trillion to the fed...
Updated: 4 hours ago

Another voice: Privacy in the internet age

How much information about you is on your cellphone? Likely the most intimate details of your life: photographs, internet searches, text and email conversations with friends and colleagues. And though you might not know it, your phone is constantly c...
Published: 12/10/17
Updated: 12/11/17
Editorial: Grand jury could force reforms of juvenile justice system

Editorial: Grand jury could force reforms of juvenile justice system

Confronted with documentation of sanctioned brutality and sexual abuse in Floridaís juvenile detention centers, the reaction from Gov. Rick Scottís administration was defensive and obtuse. So itís welcome news that Miami-Dade State Attorney Katherine...
Published: 12/08/17
Updated: 12/11/17

Editorial: U.S. House sides with NRA over stateís rights on concealed weapons permits

With the horror of the mass shootings at a Las Vegas country music concert and a small Texas church still fresh, the U.S. House finally has taken action on guns. But the bill it passed last week wonít make Americans safer from gun violence. It is an ...
Published: 12/07/17
Editorial: Hillsborough cannot afford pay raises for teachers

Editorial: Hillsborough cannot afford pay raises for teachers

There is no satisfaction for anyone in the standoff over pay raises between the Hillsborough County School District and its teachers. Most teachers across the nation already are underpaid, but this district simply cannot afford the raises teachers ex...
Published: 12/07/17
Editorial: Impact of Water Street project extends beyond buildings

Editorial: Impact of Water Street project extends beyond buildings

With a buildout of $3 billion encompassing entire city blocks, itís obvious that Jeff Vinikís plans will change the look and feel of downtown Tampa. But the Tampa Bay Lightning owner unveiled a broader vision last week that reflects how far the impac...
Published: 12/06/17
Updated: 12/08/17
Editorial: Make texting while driving a primary offense

Editorial: Make texting while driving a primary offense

It is dangerous and illegal to text while driving in Florida, and police should be able to pull over and ticket those lawbreakers without witnessing another violation first. House Speaker Richard Corcoran has lent his powerful voice to legislation th...
Published: 12/06/17
Updated: 12/07/17

Editorial: Outsourcing common sense on St. Petersburg Pier naming rights

St. Petersburg officials predict that selling the naming rights to parts of the new Pier could generate $100,000 in annual revenue. But first the city wants to pay a consultant to tell it how and to whom to sell the rights. Why do city officials need...
Published: 12/06/17
Updated: 12/07/17

Another voice: Trumpís risky move

President Donald Trumpís decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israelís capital has a certain amount of common sense on its side. As a practical matter, West Jerusalem has been the seat of Israeli government since 1949, and no conceivable formula for Pa...
Published: 12/06/17
Updated: 12/07/17
Editorial: Tampaís MOSI reinvents itself

Editorial: Tampaís MOSI reinvents itself

A tactical retreat and regrouping seems to be paying off for Hillsborough Countyís Museum of Science and Industry. After paring back its operations, the museum posted a small profit over the past year, enabling the attraction to keep its doors open a...
Published: 12/05/17
Updated: 12/07/17