A New York Times editorial: A patriot returns

His sacrifice is why we vote
An Army carry team moves a transfer case containing the remains of Maj. Brent R. Taylor at Dover Air Force Base, Del., on Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018. Taylor, 39, of Ogden, Utah, died Nov. 3, 2018, in Kabul province, Afghanistan, of wounds sustained from small arms fire. [AP photo by Steve Ruark]
An Army carry team moves a transfer case containing the remains of Maj. Brent R. Taylor at Dover Air Force Base, Del., on Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018. Taylor, 39, of Ogden, Utah, died Nov. 3, 2018, in Kabul province, Afghanistan, of wounds sustained from small arms fire. [AP photo by Steve Ruark]
Published November 8

Brent Taylor, the mayor of North Ogden, Utah, and a major in the National Guard, was killed in Afghanistan on Saturday on his fourth deployment to a war zone. As Americans headed to the polls early Tuesday, Jennie Taylor, his wife and the mother of his seven children, was at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware to meet his remains. Their two oldest sons were by her side. “It seems only fitting that Brent, who in death now represents something so much greater than any of our own individual lives,” she said, “has come home to U.S. soil in a flag-draped casket on our Election Day.” Major Taylor, 39, had guided several large infrastructure improvements as mayor since 2013. In his final Facebook post, in late October, Major Taylor, a Republican, said that he hoped “everyone back home exercises their precious right to vote” and said that whether Republicans or Democrats win, “We all remember that we have far more as Americans that unites us than divides us.”

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