Monday, April 23, 2018
Editorials

Editorial: Feds, state need to step up on opioid crisis

The widespread devastation of the opioid crisis becomes clearer with each new report. Nationwide, opioids have helped increase mortality rates for the first time this century, and drug overdoses are now the leading cause of death for Americans under 50. In Florida, during the first six months of 2016 opioids killed an average of 14 people every day. Only a comprehensive, aggressive response coordinated by the federal and state governments will start to reverse the drug epidemic that is ravaging families and communities.

Led by Attorney General Pam Bondi, Florida aggressively cracked down on the pill mill crisis that peaked in 2010. Tougher penalties for pill mill operators and better oversight of prescription drugs were effective measures that helped reverse the trend. But cracking down on one area of drug abuse created unintended consequences, as addicts who relied on pill mills turned to stronger opioids available on the streets, such as heroin and fentanyl. In 2010, eight people in Florida were dying every day on average from opioids. For the first half of 2016, that average nearly doubled. The broad trend is the same nationally, as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported last week that prescriptions for opioids declined between 2012 and 2015 as the overall death rate from drugs such as heroin and fentanyl rose much faster.

State officials are on the case. Gov. Rick Scott extended his declaration of a public health emergency to distribute $27 million in federal money for various treatment and prevention programs, including $17.8 million for medication-assisted treatment and related counseling. A three-year minimum sentence for people caught with 4 grams of fentanyl or carfentanyl approved by the Legislature this spring and signed into law by Scott should be another deterrent to dealers. The $10.5 million in state money allocated by Tallahassee to reduce opioid dependency will help as well. But the scale of this effort remains too small.

Ohio, for example, spends roughly $1 billion per year to fight drug abuse. Florida still does not have enough treatment centers, workers and beds to meet the needs of addicts. Emergency rooms have been overwhelmed with treating people for overdoses and rely on a revive-and-release strategy, with no legal requirements to do more. That leaves plenty of room to exploit the situation. Politico reported this week about so-called "sober homes" in Palm Beach County that attract thousands of addicts and charge outrageous prices for screening to soak up insurance money. They are largely unregulated, provide no treatment and generate dozens of emergency calls for overdoses.

Strong federal support is the essential element in making massive changes, and President Donald Trump promised in March "to help those who have become so badly addicted.'' Yet Washington has failed to deliver. The Republican legislation to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act would weaken efforts to fight opioid abuse, particularly by reducing federal money that would be spent for Medicaid. A proposal to add $45 billion in the next decade to fight opioids in the Senate bill pales in comparison to the $772 billion in overall Medicaid reductions it would make by 2026. Grant money has to complement health coverage, not substitute it.

To effectively combat this crisis will require a more aggressive and holistic response — and not just on the punishment side. The critical step is greatly expanding treatment and prevention resources to help addicts. That requires long-term care, counseling and oversight that hospitals and treatment centers across the state simply do not have the capacity or financial resources to provide now. Florida and other states cannot reverse the tide by themselves, and the president and Congress need to step up with a real commitment of money and resources.

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Editorial: Pruitt sets new low for ethics at EPA

Editorial: Pruitt sets new low for ethics at EPA

Not too many people took then-candidate Donald Trump seriously when he famously campaigned to "drain the swamp" as president. But that shouldn’t give this administration a free pass to excuse the behavior of Scott Pruitt, the administrator of the Env...
Published: 04/22/18
Editorial: Allegiant Air still has safety issues

Editorial: Allegiant Air still has safety issues

Allegiant Air’s safety record remains troubling, and the Federal Aviation Administration’s reluctance to talk about it is no more encouraging. Those are the key takeaways from a 60 Minutes report on the low-cost carrier’s high rate of mid-flight brea...
Published: 04/21/18

Editorial: Women’s work undervalued in bay area

Even a strong economy and low unemployment cannot overcome the persistent pay gap affecting full-time working women in Florida. A new report shows women in Florida earned 12.5 percent less on average than their male counterparts, and the disparities ...
Published: 04/21/18
Editorial: New Cuba president is chance for new start

Editorial: New Cuba president is chance for new start

For all the symbolism, Raul Castro’s handoff of the Cuban presidency this week amounts to less than meets the eye even if his handpicked successor, the Communist Party functionary Miguel Diaz-Canel Bermudez, is the first person not named Castro to le...
Published: 04/20/18

Editorial: A missed chance for open primary elections

The Florida Constitution Revision Commission did a lot of things wrong this week by combining unrelated or unpalatable provisions into single amendments that will appear on the November ballot. It also wasted an opportunity to do one thing right. The...
Published: 04/20/18
Editorial: When they visit Nature’s Classroom, kids are right where they belong

Editorial: When they visit Nature’s Classroom, kids are right where they belong

The Hillsborough school district planted a fruitful seed with the opening of Nature’s Classroom five decades ago on the cypress-lined banks of the Hillsborough River northeast of Tampa. • The lessons taught there to some 17,000 sixth graders each yea...
Published: 04/20/18

Editorial: Equality pays off on Southwest Flight 1380

The passengers of Southwest Flight 1380 can be thankful that, 33 years ago, the U.S. Navy took the lead on equal opportunity.Capt. Tammie Jo Shults was piloting the flight from New York to Dallas on Tuesday when an engine exploded, blowing out a wind...
Published: 04/19/18
Updated: 04/20/18
Editorial: Why single-member districts would be bad for Hillsborough commission

Editorial: Why single-member districts would be bad for Hillsborough commission

Anyone looking to make Hillsborough County government bigger, costlier, more dysfunctional and less of a regional force should love the idea that Commissioner Sandy Murman rolled out this week. She proposes enlarging the seven-member board to nine, e...
Published: 04/19/18
Updated: 04/20/18
Editorial: Improving foster care in Hillsborough

Editorial: Improving foster care in Hillsborough

A new foster care provider in Hillsborough County is poised to take over operations in May, only months after its predecessor was fired for what was alleged to be a pattern of failing to supervise at-risk children in its care. Many of the case manage...
Published: 04/18/18

Another voice: Back to postal reform

President Donald Trump is angry at Amazon for, in his tweeted words, "costing the United States Post Office massive amounts of money for being their Delivery Boy." Yet in more recent days, Trump has at least channeled his feelings in what could prove...
Published: 04/17/18
Updated: 04/18/18