Thursday, June 21, 2018
Editorials

Editorial: Gov. Rick Scott fails all Floridians on health care

Gov. Rick Scott's cruel indifference to Floridians who can't afford medical care illustrates why he is the state's worst governor in the last half-century. He has no empathy for its people, no credible explanation for his position and no interest in reasonable compromise. The conservative Republican prefers to wage an ideological fight with the Obama administration without regard for the human and financial costs, and that is morally and economically indefensible.

It comes as no surprise that Scott renounced his support last week for accepting billions in federal Medicaid expansion money. He has been silent on it for months, assuming the issue would fade and the Legislature would not touch it. But opinion polls show voters support taking the federal money, and a broad coalition of businesses offered a sensible plan to use the money to subsidize the cost of private insurance for more than 800,000 low-income Floridians. The Senate unanimously approved a state budget that includes the bipartisan proposal, the more conservative House refused to include the Medicaid expansion money, and the pressure was on the governor to provide some leadership.

Instead, Scott reversed himself. The governor who said two years ago that he would accept the federal money because he could not "in good conscience deny the uninsured access to care'' had a change of heart and opposes it. Scott says the Obama administration cannot be trusted to follow through, but he is the one who has failed to act in good faith.

Remember that Scott opposed the Affordable Care Act that includes Medicaid expansion when he first ran for governor in 2010. Then he announced he would accept the Medicaid expansion money in 2013, just hours after the Obama administration agreed to waivers the governor sought to transform Medicaid into a privatized managed care system. Yet Scott's silence was deafening in the following weeks as two conservative Republicans from Pasco County, then-House Speaker Will Weatherford and top lieutenant Richard Corcoran, refused to let the House adopt the plan that was passed 38-1 by the Senate. If there is a trust issue, it is in the Governor's Mansion.

Scott's excuse for changing his position now on Medicaid expansion money is that the Obama administration says it will stop sending more than $1 billion a year to the state's Low Income Pool this summer. That money goes to hospitals and community health centers to help cover the cost of treating the uninsured and the underinsured, and the federal government made clear last year it would extend the payments for one final year ending this June. Yet Scott included that federal money in his 2015-16 proposed budget as though it would magically keep coming. If there is a lack of integrity in funding health care programs, it is in the Governor's Mansion.

The governor is pushing $673 million in tax cuts, and two-thirds of that total would come from reducing a tax on cable, satellite and cellphone services. Annual savings on those services for a typical family: $43. Yet Scott refuses to embrace a health care plan that would bring several billion federal dollars each year to Florida, subsidize health insurance by far more than $43 a year for low-income residents, and save state taxpayers more than $1.7 billion over five years that is spent on health care. If there is a failure to responsibly manage the public's money, it is in the Governor's Mansion.

After Scott narrowly won re-election just five months ago, he called for an end to partisanship and promised to help Floridians live the American dream. That dream includes good health and access to affordable health care. Yet Scott has broken his promise to accept Medicaid expansion money. His proposed state budget included other health care money that the federal government long ago told him would not be coming. The state surgeon general chosen by Scott would not even offer his opinion last week of the Senate plan to use Medicaid expansion money when pressed by frustrated senators, who then declined to confirm his appointment.

This is a pivotal moment for Florida and for hundreds of thousands of residents desperate for access to health care. The financial and moral arguments for accepting the Medicaid expansion money are strong. The governor will not lead, so he has to be led. That leadership has to come from the Florida Chamber of Commerce, Associated Industries of Florida, hospitals and other health care advocates, the League of Women Voters, AARP, Senate Republicans and Democrats and every pragmatic business and voter who recognizes this is in the best interest of our state and our residents.

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Editorial: Congress should ban splitting kids, parents

Editorial: Congress should ban splitting kids, parents

The shocking scenes of immigrant children crying after being taken from their parents at the border exposed a new level of cruelty by the Trump administration, and though the president reversed course Wednesday, Congress needs to end the shameful pra...
Updated: 2 hours ago
Editorial: A court victory for protecting Florida’s environment

Editorial: A court victory for protecting Florida’s environment

A Tallahassee judge has affirmed the overwhelming intent of Florida voters by ruling that state lawmakers have failed to comply with a constitutional amendment that is supposed to provide a specific pot of money to buy and preserve endangered lands. ...
Published: 06/18/18
Updated: 06/20/18
Editorial: Trump should stop taking children away from parents at the border

Editorial: Trump should stop taking children away from parents at the border

Innocent children should not be used as political pawns. That is exactly what the Trump administration is doing by cruelly prying young children away from their parents as these desperate families cross the Mexican border in search of a safer, better...
Published: 06/17/18
Updated: 06/19/18

Editorial: ATF should get tougher on gun dealers who violate the law

Gun dealers who break the law by turning a blind eye to federal licensing rules are as dangerous to society as people who have no right to a possess a firearm in the first place. Yet a recent report shows that the federal agency responsible for polic...
Published: 06/17/18
Updated: 06/18/18
Editorial: Encouraging private citizens to step up on transit

Editorial: Encouraging private citizens to step up on transit

The new grass-roots effort to put a transportation package before Hillsborough County voters in November faces a tough slog. Voters rejected a similar effort in 2010, and another in 2016 by elected officials never made it from the gate. But the lates...
Published: 06/15/18
Editorial: 40 years later, honoring remarkable legacy of Nelson Poynter

Editorial: 40 years later, honoring remarkable legacy of Nelson Poynter

Forty years ago today, Nelson Poynter died. He was the last individual to own this newspaper, and to keep the Times connected to this community, he did something remarkable. He gave it away.In his last years, Mr. Poynter recognized that sooner or lat...
Published: 06/15/18

There was no FBI anti-Trump conspiracy

The Justice Department released Thursday the highly anticipated report on the FBI’s handling of the Hillary Clinton email probe and other sensitive issues in the 2016 election. It is not the report President Donald Trump wanted. But there is enough i...
Published: 06/14/18
Updated: 06/15/18

Voter purge may be legal, but it’s also suppression

The Supreme Court’s ruling last Monday to allow Ohio’s purging of its voter rolls is difficult to dispute legally. While federal law prohibits removing citizens from voter rolls simply because they haven’t voted, Ohio’s purge is slightly different. T...
Published: 06/14/18
Updated: 06/15/18

Editorial: Free rides will serve as a test of whether the streetcar is serious transportation

Who wouldn’t jump at the chance to ride for free?This fall, the TECO Streetcar Line eliminates its $2.50-a-ride-fare, providing the best opportunity yet to see whether the system’s vintage streetcar replicas can serve as a legitimate transportation a...
Published: 06/14/18
Updated: 06/15/18

AT&T and the case for digital innovation

A good way to guarantee you’ll be wrong about something is to predict the future of technology. As in, "One day, we’ll all …" Experts can hazard guesses about artificial intelligence, driverless cars or the death of cable television, but technologica...
Published: 06/14/18