Monday, January 22, 2018
Editorials

Editorial: Legislature owes Floridians more apologies

The Florida Legislature apologized this spring for decades of violent abuse at a state-run reform school for boys. It apologized to the families of the Groveland Four, the young black men wrongly accused of raping a white woman nearly 70 years ago. Before they approve a state budget and adjourn Monday, legislators owe a few apologies for their own actions.

• They should apologize to teachers, students and their families for micromanaging and financially starving public schools. Local school districts would get a token increase in per student spending while taxes are being cut and more than $1 billion is being socked away in state reserves. They would get even less money for maintenance and construction than last year, and privately run charter schools that enroll a fraction of the students would get the same amount. Meanwhile, Hillsborough County students sit in hot classrooms because the air conditioning is broken, and the school district can't pay for dozens of new schools it will need in the coming years to accommodate growth. Yet House Speaker Richard Corcoran, R-Land O'Lakes, insisted on $200 million to attract charter schools that would essentially replace struggling public schools, and voucher programs were expanded to send more poor kids and kids with disabilities to private schools.

• They should apologize to voters who approved constitutional amendments requiring money to be spent on conserving environmental lands, making it easier to install rooftop solar panels and legalizing medical marijuana. They spent no money on Florida Forever, the state's land-buying program. They added unnecessary hurdles to installing solar panels, and they tried to make it harder to obtain medical marijuana than a fair reading of the amendment contemplates.

• They should apologize to the poor who need health care and the hospitals who treat them whether they can pay or not. They cut Medicaid payments to Tampa General, Bayfront Health in St. Petersburg and other hospitals by more than $500 million. They bet a deal with the federal government to create a $1.5 billion Low Income Pool for uncompensated care will mitigate the cuts, but there is no guarantee.

• They should apologize to renters, businesses and local governments for placing a constitutional amendment on the 2018 ballot that would raise the homestead exemption by $25,000. That would be an unneeded middle class tax cut for homeowners and shift more of the tax burden to everyone else. It also would force counties and cities to either raise local property taxes or cut millions in spending on law enforcement, parks and other services. But to Corcoran, lawmakers are saving Floridians from "wasteful, unaccountable, lazy governments.''

• They should apologize to the tourism industry for slashing Visit Florida's budget by about two-thirds. The state's marketing arm has made some questionable spending decisions, but it requires advertising to reach tourists and this is nothing but a vendetta by Corcoran against Gov. Rick Scott.

• They should apologize to community college students for limiting their options. Universities will receive significant additional funding, but community colleges would lose millions in money for remedial education. In a state where more students need affordable options close to home, there also would be a cap on enrollment for students seeking four-year degrees at state colleges to 15 percent of the total enrollment at each school.

The apologies for Florida's past sins were appropriate and a long time coming. The apologies for the Legislature's latest failures would be just as necessary and more timely — but don't hold your breath.

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Editorial: Look hard into Tampa Bay and Pinellas CareerSource CEO, and get to the bottom of the numbers and the money

Editorial: Look hard into Tampa Bay and Pinellas CareerSource CEO, and get to the bottom of the numbers and the money

Something is seriously amiss at Tampa Bay’s two CareerSource agencies, which receive millions in federal and state money to match unemployed workers with local employers. First, the agencies appear to be taking credit — and money — for job placements...
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A Chicago Tribune editorial: Shut down this shutdown habit

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Updated: 7 hours ago
Editorial: Beware of social media targeting kids

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Ignoring all available evidence that screen time and social media exposure can be harmful to kids, Facebook recently unveiled a new messaging app targeting children under 13. It’s yet another battlefront for parents who have to constantly combat the ...
Published: 01/21/18
Editorial: Too soon for Tampa Bay to settle for buses over light rail

Editorial: Too soon for Tampa Bay to settle for buses over light rail

The good news on the transportation front is that Tampa Bay’s government and business leaders are working together like never before to connect the region’s largest cities, attractions and employment centers with a more robust mass transit system. Th...
Published: 01/20/18
Editorial: Saying ‘thank you’ helps Tampa police build needed trust

Editorial: Saying ‘thank you’ helps Tampa police build needed trust

The smiles, applause and at least one hug belied the grim impetus for a gathering last week at a neighborhood center in Tampa — the Seminole Heights killings.The Tampa Police Department held a ceremony to thank those who helped in the investigation t...
Published: 01/19/18
Updated: 01/21/18
Editorial: Criminal charges should finally wake up FSU fraternities to hazing’s dangers

Editorial: Criminal charges should finally wake up FSU fraternities to hazing’s dangers

The death last fall of a 20-year-old Florida State University fraternity pledge revealed pervasive dangerous behavior within the school’s Greek system. Andrew Coffey, a Pi Kappa Phi pledge, died from alcohol poisoning after an off-campus party, and a...
Published: 01/19/18

Editorial: Confronting racial distrust in St. Petersburg, one conversation at a time

The St. Petersburg Police Department’s heavy presence in Midtown on Martin Luther King Jr. Day and the community animosity it stirred have raised a familiar, troubling question: Can St. Petersburg’s racial divisions ever be reconciled?That big ideal ...
Published: 01/19/18
William March: Tampa Bay Democrats line up for state legislative races

William March: Tampa Bay Democrats line up for state legislative races

A surge of Democrats seeking local legislative offices and hoping for a "blue wave" in the 2018 election continued last week, led by Bob Buesing filing to run again versus state Sen. Dana Young, R-Tampa.In addition:• Heather Kenyon Stahl of Tampa has...
Published: 01/19/18

Editorial: State’s warning shot should get attention of Hillsborough schools

The state Board of Education hopefully sent the message this week with its warning shot about the slow pace of the turnaround at Hillsborough County’s low-performing schools.The board criticized the school system for failing to replace administrators...
Published: 01/18/18
Updated: 01/19/18
Editorial: More talk, answers needed on future of USF St. Petersburg

Editorial: More talk, answers needed on future of USF St. Petersburg

The Florida Legislature’s abrupt move to strip the University of South Florida St. Petersburg of its hard-earned separate accreditation and transform it back into a satellite of the major research university lacks detail and an appreciation for histo...
Published: 01/18/18