Tuesday, May 22, 2018
Editorials

Editorial: Legislature owes Floridians more apologies

The Florida Legislature apologized this spring for decades of violent abuse at a state-run reform school for boys. It apologized to the families of the Groveland Four, the young black men wrongly accused of raping a white woman nearly 70 years ago. Before they approve a state budget and adjourn Monday, legislators owe a few apologies for their own actions.

• They should apologize to teachers, students and their families for micromanaging and financially starving public schools. Local school districts would get a token increase in per student spending while taxes are being cut and more than $1 billion is being socked away in state reserves. They would get even less money for maintenance and construction than last year, and privately run charter schools that enroll a fraction of the students would get the same amount. Meanwhile, Hillsborough County students sit in hot classrooms because the air conditioning is broken, and the school district can't pay for dozens of new schools it will need in the coming years to accommodate growth. Yet House Speaker Richard Corcoran, R-Land O'Lakes, insisted on $200 million to attract charter schools that would essentially replace struggling public schools, and voucher programs were expanded to send more poor kids and kids with disabilities to private schools.

• They should apologize to voters who approved constitutional amendments requiring money to be spent on conserving environmental lands, making it easier to install rooftop solar panels and legalizing medical marijuana. They spent no money on Florida Forever, the state's land-buying program. They added unnecessary hurdles to installing solar panels, and they tried to make it harder to obtain medical marijuana than a fair reading of the amendment contemplates.

• They should apologize to the poor who need health care and the hospitals who treat them whether they can pay or not. They cut Medicaid payments to Tampa General, Bayfront Health in St. Petersburg and other hospitals by more than $500 million. They bet a deal with the federal government to create a $1.5 billion Low Income Pool for uncompensated care will mitigate the cuts, but there is no guarantee.

• They should apologize to renters, businesses and local governments for placing a constitutional amendment on the 2018 ballot that would raise the homestead exemption by $25,000. That would be an unneeded middle class tax cut for homeowners and shift more of the tax burden to everyone else. It also would force counties and cities to either raise local property taxes or cut millions in spending on law enforcement, parks and other services. But to Corcoran, lawmakers are saving Floridians from "wasteful, unaccountable, lazy governments.''

• They should apologize to the tourism industry for slashing Visit Florida's budget by about two-thirds. The state's marketing arm has made some questionable spending decisions, but it requires advertising to reach tourists and this is nothing but a vendetta by Corcoran against Gov. Rick Scott.

• They should apologize to community college students for limiting their options. Universities will receive significant additional funding, but community colleges would lose millions in money for remedial education. In a state where more students need affordable options close to home, there also would be a cap on enrollment for students seeking four-year degrees at state colleges to 15 percent of the total enrollment at each school.

The apologies for Florida's past sins were appropriate and a long time coming. The apologies for the Legislature's latest failures would be just as necessary and more timely — but don't hold your breath.

Comments
Editorial: Candor key step to restoring trust at Johns Hopkins All Children’s Heart Institute

Editorial: Candor key step to restoring trust at Johns Hopkins All Children’s Heart Institute

Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital has begun the important work of rebuilding trust with its patients and the community following revelations of medical errors and other problems at its Heart Institute. CEO Dr. Jonathan Ellen candidly acknowledges...
Updated: 9 hours ago
Editorial: Tampa Bay House members fail to stand up to Big Sugar

Editorial: Tampa Bay House members fail to stand up to Big Sugar

Big Sugar remains king in Florida. Just three of the state’s 27 House members voted for an amendment to the farm bill late Thursday that would have started unwinding the needless government supports for sugar that gouge taxpayers. Predictably, the am...
Published: 05/18/18
Editorial: Bondi holds drug industry accountable for Florida opioid crisis

Editorial: Bondi holds drug industry accountable for Florida opioid crisis

Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi’s lawsuit against the nation’s largest drug makers and distributors marks a moment of awakening in the state’s battle to recover from the opioid crisis. In blunt, forceful language, Bondi accuses these companies of ...
Published: 05/18/18
Editorial: A sweet note for the Florida Orchestra’s violin program for at-risk kids

Editorial: A sweet note for the Florida Orchestra’s violin program for at-risk kids

This is music to the ears. Members of the Florida Orchestra will introduce at-risk students to the violin this summer at some Hillsborough recreation centers. For free.An $80,000 grant to the University Area Community Development Corp. will pay for s...
Published: 05/17/18
Updated: 05/18/18
Trump backs off China tariff threat as China pumps money into a Trump family project

Trump backs off China tariff threat as China pumps money into a Trump family project

In barely six weeks, President Donald Trump has gone from threatening to impose $150 billion in tariffs on Chinese goods to extending a lifeline to ZTE, a Chinese cell phone company that violated U.S. sanctions by doing business with Iran and North K...
Published: 05/17/18
Editorial: Activism as seniors helps put Hillsborough graduates on the right path

Editorial: Activism as seniors helps put Hillsborough graduates on the right path

Lots of teenagers are walking together this week in Hillsborough County, a practice they’ve grown accustomed to during this remarkable school year.We can only hope they keep walking for the rest of their lives.Tens of thousands of them this week are ...
Published: 05/17/18
Editorial: Bondi holds drug industry accountable for Florida opioid crisis

Editorial: Bondi holds drug industry accountable for Florida opioid crisis

Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi’s lawsuit against the nation’s largest drug makers and distributors marks a moment of awakening in the state’s battle to recover from the opioid crisis. In blunt, forceful language, Bondi accuses these companies of ...
Published: 05/16/18
Updated: 05/18/18
Editorial: Johns Hopkins All Children’s should be more open about mistakes

Editorial: Johns Hopkins All Children’s should be more open about mistakes

A state investigation raises even more concern about medical errors at Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital and the venerable St. Petersburg institution’s lack of candor to the community. Regulators have determined the hospital broke Florida law by ...
Published: 05/16/18
Updated: 05/17/18
Editorial: St. Petersburg recycling worth the effort despite cost issues

Editorial: St. Petersburg recycling worth the effort despite cost issues

St. Petersburg’s 3-year-old recycling program has reached an undesirable tipping point, with operating costs exceeding the income from selling the recyclable materials. The shift is driven by falling commodity prices and new policies in China that cu...
Published: 05/15/18
Updated: 05/18/18
Editorial: HUD’s flawed plan to raise rents on poor people

Editorial: HUD’s flawed plan to raise rents on poor people

Housing Secretary Ben Carson has a surefire way to reduce the waiting lists for public housing: Charge more to people who already live there. Hitting a family living in poverty with rent increases of $100 or more a month would force more people onto ...
Published: 05/15/18
Updated: 05/18/18