Tuesday, August 21, 2018
Editorials

Editorial: Tampa clears path for next downtown community

The look and economics of Tampa's urban core enter a new era this month, as the Tampa Housing Authority begins to tear down North Boulevard Homes, the first phase of replacing an aged public housing project with an entirely new urban setting of apartments, homes, shops, parks and restaurants. The buildout will take years, and the city still has to settle many details that will shape the character of this community. But this effort could reverse nearly a half-century of blight, and it promises to create a more affordable environment for those eager to experience downtown living.

The shuttered complex will be demolished in two phases, part of a broader effort by the city to remake 120 acres on the west side of the Hillsborough River. The cinder block, World War II-era public housing project fronts the commercial core of the West River district. Officials expect to convert this area into a walkable neighborhood of shaded streets, apartments, restaurants and shops sloping toward the river and new public parks. Already the city is remaking Riverfront Park, several blocks to the east, which will serve as West River's central outdoor space.

The elements of West River are coming together in a timely and orderly way as the urban market for housing and retail in Tampa remains strong. Aside from the remake of Riverfront Park and the clearing of North Boulevard Homes, the city has vacated its 12-acre truck yard to the north, presenting an opportunity for mid-rise apartments on a bluff overlooking the river. Virtually the entire area in the West River footprint is publicly owned. That creates great leeway to redevelop the area with a common vision and quality that can be missing when working piecemeal with many different property owners.

Its size, proximity to downtown and the riverfront and potential for much-needed affordable housing make West River a desirable public project. The city and housing authority will need to ensure this area serves a mix of incomes and has a distinct character. Its decent tree canopy is a good backdrop for a mixed-use commercial core. Its clean street grids make it easy to serve the area with robust mass transit, which is key to making housing affordable by giving residents an opportunity to forgo a car. The development in Tampa Heights, directly across the river, also adds to the critical mass of new housing, shopping and parks in the area. The city is building value on the north end of downtown for residents and businesses alike, and bridging the gap between the city center and established neighborhoods to the north.

West River is one of the most ambitious remakes in Tampa's history, and challenges remain. President Donald Trump has proposed eliminating a range of transit and development grants that Tampa and other cities have used to rebuild their downtown cores. The market still will rely in part on urban pioneers willing to take a chance. And creating the full development will take years; property owners will need to have confidence and a commitment to the long term. Whoever succeeds Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn when his term expires in 2019 will need to follow through in concert with other local agencies to meet the demands for schools, policing and other essentials. But West River has great promise, and it should be a city priority. It has all the elements of a live-work-play environment on a grand scale.

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Editorial: The Catholic Church’s proper response to Pennsylvania scandal

Editorial: The Catholic Church’s proper response to Pennsylvania scandal

Forceful words are coming from the pope’s pen as well as pulpits around Tampa Bay: The sexual abuse of minors, which proliferated for decades within the Roman Catholic Church, were not merely sins but crimes whose repercussions are still being felt b...
Updated: 11 hours ago
Editorial: Did Rick Scott’s wallet affect his epiphany on rail line?

Editorial: Did Rick Scott’s wallet affect his epiphany on rail line?

Within weeks of taking office in 2011, Gov. Rick Scott made one of the worst decisions of his administration and refused $2.4 billion in federal money for a high-speed rail line between Tampa and Orlando. Within months of leaving office, the governor...
Published: 08/17/18
Editorial: Hillsborough has a place among growing number of governments suing opioid makers

Editorial: Hillsborough has a place among growing number of governments suing opioid makers

Local governments across the land can find plenty of reasons to go after the drug industry over the crisis of opioid addiction.Hillsborough County can find more reasons than most.• In 2016, the county led the state with 579 babies born addicted to dr...
Published: 08/17/18
Editorial: Here’s what needs to be done to stop algae blooms

Editorial: Here’s what needs to be done to stop algae blooms

The environmental crisis in South Florida has fast become a political crisis. Politicians in both parties are busy blaming one another for the waves of toxic algae blooms spreading out from Lake Okeechobee and beyond, fouling both coasts and damaging...
Published: 08/15/18
Updated: 08/20/18
Editorial: Journalists are friends of democracy, not the enemy

Editorial: Journalists are friends of democracy, not the enemy

It is real news that the Hillsborough County School District said this week it will accelerate testing for lead in drinking water and release the results after the Tampa Bay Times reported testing would take years and that until we asked families wer...
Published: 08/15/18
Updated: 08/16/18

Bumping into GOP cowardice on guns

One small island of sanity in the generally insane ocean of American gun culture is the near-complete federal ban on civilian possession of fully automatic weapons — machine guns.The nation got a bitter taste last year of what we’d be facing on a reg...
Published: 08/14/18
Updated: 08/17/18
Editorial: Vaccinations are safe way to prevent measles

Editorial: Vaccinations are safe way to prevent measles

The revelation that three people in Pinellas County have contracted the measles virus should be a wake-up call to everyone to get vaccinated if they haven’t been — and to implore parents to immunize their kids. Contagious diseases such as measles can...
Published: 08/14/18
Updated: 08/17/18
Editorial: Habitat for Humanity still has questions to answer about selling mortgages

Editorial: Habitat for Humanity still has questions to answer about selling mortgages

A good reputation can vanish overnight, which is why Habitat for Humanity of Hills-borough County made a smart decision by announcing it would seek to buy back 12 mortgages it sold to a Tampa company with a history of flipping properties. The arrange...
Published: 08/14/18
Editorial: Vote — or a minority of the electorate will decide your future without you

Editorial: Vote — or a minority of the electorate will decide your future without you

40%of Americans who were eligible to vote for president in 2016 just didn’t bother. That number dwarfs the portion of all eligible voters who cast a ballot for President Donald Trump — 27.6 percent — or, for that matter, Hillary Clinton, 28.8 percent...
Published: 08/13/18
Updated: 08/17/18
Editorial: Why stand your ground has to go

Editorial: Why stand your ground has to go

Pinellas-Pasco State Attorney Bernie McCabe made a reasonable decision to charge Michael Drejka with manslaughter in last month’s deadly Clearwater convenience store parking lot confrontation. The shooting, which erupted over use of a handicap parkin...
Published: 08/13/18