Sunday, February 25, 2018
Editorials

Editorial: Trump should give up baseless claims about rigged popular vote

President-elect Donald Trump is railing against the very system that will put him in the White House. Without any substantiation whatsoever, the man who will be president went on a Twitter rant this weekend, saying he would have "won the popular vote if you deduct the millions of people who voted illegally." This is a baseless assertion that undermines the faith that Americans should have in their system of free and fair elections. In fact, the Times' own PolitiFact.com rates the claim Pants on Fire.

Trump's daylong series of angry Twitter posts Sunday was precipitated by Jill Stein, the Green Party candidate, successfully seeking a recount in Wisconsin and potentially in Michigan and Pennsylvania as well. Trump leads in Wisconsin by 22,177 votes, in Michigan by 10,704 and in Pennsylvania by 68,695. Keep in mind that Hillary Clinton's campaign did not initiate any call for a recount, but to protect her interests and to honor the millions who voted for her, it has agreed to take part since one is under way. Even so, the Clinton campaign acknowledges reality and doesn't expect anything to change. The Clinton team's general counsel said her campaign has not discovered any "actionable evidence" of hacking or attempts to tamper with the vote.

In other words, they are appropriately participating in a lawful, fact-based process to confirm what they already expect to be true — that Trump won the Electoral College vote fair and square. What is not appropriate is for a president-elect to cast doubt — without a shred of evidence — on the integrity of the American system of electing its president. Trump went even further with a later tweet, another fact-free assertion of "Serious voter fraud in Virginia, New Hampshire and California — so why isn't the media reporting on this? Serious bias — big problem!"

Clinton currently leads Trump in the popular vote by 2,243,329 votes, but he will win the Electoral College by 306 votes to her 232. That is the way the U.S. Constitution mandates that Americans elect their president. (In a column on the facing page, Harvard law professor Lawrence Lessig makes an interesting historical argument for why the electors should pick Clinton rather than Trump, but he is wrong.)

In participating in a recount in Wisconsin, Clinton's campaign will merely confirm what is already known. She accepts the result. Why can't he? The president-elect needs to become more presidential. The chaotic candidate of change needs to become a more stable force — now. There is too much at stake not to be sober and serious. The challenges, to use the president-elect's phrase, are big-league.

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Editorial: Improve school security plans with gun controls

Editorial: Improve school security plans with gun controls

Gov. Rick Scott and key members of the Florida Legislature offered ambitious proposals Friday that would plug some holes in the stateís safety net, strengthen school security and spend up to a half-billion dollars in response to last weekís massacre ...
Published: 02/23/18
Editorial: Six proposals for reasonable gun control

Editorial: Six proposals for reasonable gun control

Enough is enough. The mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School has renewed conversations about gun control in Washington and Tallahassee. Young people are demanding action, and there are cracks in the National Rifle Associationís solid w...
Published: 02/23/18
Editorial: The time to act on guns is now

Editorial: The time to act on guns is now

The nationís conversation on guns took an encouraging step this week in three essential places ó South Florida, Tallahassee and Washington ó as survivors, victimsí families and elected leaders searched painfully and sincerely for common ground after ...
Published: 02/22/18

Editorial: FDLE probe of state fair fiasco falls short

It should go without saying that Florida law frowns upon public officials who take freebies from vendors and whose agency throws business to their family. But that wasnít enough to move the Florida Department of Law Enforcement to find that the ex-di...
Published: 02/21/18
Updated: 02/23/18
Editorial: They value guns, not kids

Editorial: They value guns, not kids

They value guns over kidsSix days after 17 were killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High by a teen-ager firing an AR-15 semi-automatic rifle, the Florida House refused to even debate a bill banning the sale of assault weapons. The vote, 71 to 36, wasn...
Published: 02/21/18

Editorial: Nursing home rule should be stronger

It shouldnít take months or another tragedy for Florida ó which is hot and full of seniors ó to protect its elderly population from heat stroke in the event of an emergency. Thatís why Gov. Rick Scott had the right idea last year in calling for nursi...
Published: 02/20/18
Updated: 02/23/18
Editorial: Listen to Marjory Stoneman Douglas students demanding change

Editorial: Listen to Marjory Stoneman Douglas students demanding change

Students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School are traveling to the state capital today and declaring "never again.íí A prominent Florida Republican fundraiser vows he wonít raise another nickel until his party approves new gun controls. Across F...
Published: 02/19/18

Editorial: No more doubt about Russian meddling in election

The latest indictment by the Justice Department special counsel, Robert Mueller, refutes President Donald Trumpís claims that Russian interference in the 2016 election was a Democratic hoax. The indictment details the lengths Russian conspirators too...
Published: 02/19/18

Another voice: Tips should belong to workers, not their bosses

The Trump administration is under fire for proposing a Labor Department regulation that could result in hotel and restaurant employers dipping into the tips customers leave for their employees, depriving the nationís 14 million hard-working restauran...
Published: 02/18/18
Updated: 02/20/18
Editorial: Trumpís rising deficits and misplaced priorities

Editorial: Trumpís rising deficits and misplaced priorities

Itís not popular in Washington or virtually anywhere else these days to express concern about the rising federal deficit. Congressional Republicans who used to be deficit hawks first voted to cut taxes by $1.5 trillion over the next decade, then rais...
Published: 02/17/18