Tuesday, August 14, 2018
Editorials

Editorial: Trump travel ban better, still flawed

The watered-down travel ban that President Donald Trump ordered Monday may be easier to legally defend than the more sweeping one that was poorly drafted and blocked by the courts. But this revised version remains terrible public policy that is not supported by the facts. Such an arbitrary approach will harden anti-American sentiment around the world and will not better protect the nation from terrorists.

The order Trump signed at the White House imposes a 90-day ban on new visas for citizens of six majority-Muslim countries: Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. America will suspend its refugee program for 120 days and accept no more than 50,000 refugees next year, about half the cap set by the Obama administration. The Trump administration said it would enforce the provisions "humanely" and professionally as it works to toughen the vetting process to ensure that nationals from the six countries do not pose a threat to American security.

The new guidelines shave down the harder edges of ban that a federal district court judge in Washington state suspended last month, a decision upheld unanimously by a three-judge federal appeals panel for the 9th Circuit. The ban will not affect legal permanent residents, those holding visas and dual citizens from entering the country. It no longer includes a provision that offered a religious preference to Christians, prompting critics to tag the measure as a Muslim ban, and it removes Iraq from the list of target countries after Trump officials maintained that Iraq had agreed to tougher vetting.

Still, the administration has not made a convincing case for singling out these nations, or explained what it hopes to gain by putting a pause on travel and the refugee program. Officials did not address what Iraq had said or done to be removed from the list, making it apparent the decision was politically inspired to stem the backlash in Iraq and avoid upsetting U.S.-led efforts there to fight the Islamic State.

The administration offers a broad justification for the ban, forgoing any specifics about the threat levels from these states or the reasons why the government cannot improve security without a temporary ban. In fact, since 9/11 there have been no fatal terrorist attacks in this country by assailants with family connections in the six countries covered by the ban (there have been at least three nonfatal incidents where the attackers were from Iran or Somalia). The order will not take effect until March 16, undercutting the White House's argument that these countries pose a pressing security threat. And while the administration removed the specific religious preference for Christians, many in the Muslim world still see the United States as targeting people of one religion.

Monday's rollout was as much an exercise in face-saving as it was about policy. Having lost the first round in court and after an embarrassing weekend, the White House sought to distance Trump from a controversial issue he has personalized since before winning election. The president signed the order in private, and dispatched his secretaries of state and homeland security and the attorney general to announce the order to the press. They did not take reporters' questions.

The revised ban was widely expected and will affect fewer people, and it likely won't cause the same level of chaos as the original order. But there still is no justification for a blanket ban on these countries, or for taking a significant step to curb the resettlement of refugees.

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Editorial: Why stand your ground has to go

Editorial: Why stand your ground has to go

Pinellas-Pasco State Attorney Bernie McCabe made a reasonable decision to charge Michael Drejka with manslaughter in last month’s deadly Clearwater convenience store parking lot confrontation. The shooting, which erupted over use of a handicap parkin...
Published: 08/13/18
Editorial: Politics aside, arguments are clear for moving appellate court to Tampa

Editorial: Politics aside, arguments are clear for moving appellate court to Tampa

It’s time to re-establish a permanent home for the state appeals court that serves the Tampa Bay region.It makes sense to put it in Tampa, the same as it made sense 30 years ago when the court’s operations began moving piece by piece up Interstate 4 ...
Published: 08/09/18
Updated: 08/10/18
Editorial: A big first step toward improving transportation in Hillsborough

Editorial: A big first step toward improving transportation in Hillsborough

The Hillsborough County transit referendum that has made the November ballot is significantly stronger than two efforts that failed to reach the end zone in the past decade. The one-cent sales surtax would generate enough money to meaningfully improv...
Published: 08/09/18
Editorial: Bondi should stop fighting smokable medicial marijuana

Editorial: Bondi should stop fighting smokable medicial marijuana

The fight for medical marijuana in Florida should have ended with the resounding 2016 vote authorizing it in the state Constitution. Instead, the battle for access drags on, with Attorney General Pam Bondi waging the latest round in a lengthy legal b...
Published: 08/07/18
Updated: 08/10/18
Editorial: Warning signs of a mental health crisis in Florida

Editorial: Warning signs of a mental health crisis in Florida

They reach from South Florida to Tampa, from a high school to a college campus, from troubled kids to troubled parents. But there is a common thread connecting these tragedies: Florida has a mental health crisis. Addressing it would require spending ...
Published: 08/07/18
Updated: 08/10/18
Editorial: Time to pursue or sink ferry to MacDill

Editorial: Time to pursue or sink ferry to MacDill

A proposal to use local money to ferry workers to MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa always has been a questionable idea. The loss of nearly $5 million in federal money toward the project makes it all the more suspect. It’s time the ferry supporters off...
Published: 08/07/18
Updated: 08/10/18
Blood on the streets of Chicago

Blood on the streets of Chicago

A hot summer weekend, when Chicago should be at its most livable, brings an undercurrent of dread and horror to this city. Summer is block party season, beach season, baseball season. But in some neighborhoods, summer is killing season — when armed g...
Published: 08/07/18
Updated: 08/10/18
Editorial: FDA should not penalize premium cigars

Editorial: FDA should not penalize premium cigars

A well-meaning but poorly designed effort to keep tobacco from children could sink a niche industry and end Tampa’s fabled history as a cigar-making capital. The Food and Drug Administration needs to recognize not all tobacco products are alike...
Published: 08/06/18
Updated: 08/13/18
Editorial: New St. Petersburg Pier spot for Echelman art better, not perfect

Editorial: New St. Petersburg Pier spot for Echelman art better, not perfect

The St. Petersburg City Council has listened to the concerns of constituents and forged a compromise on where to install a signature public art piece in the new Pier District. Plans had called for an imposing aerial net sculpture to soar above Spa Be...
Published: 08/06/18
Updated: 08/07/18
Editorial: Sharpton wrong to call for sheriff’s badge in stand your ground case

Editorial: Sharpton wrong to call for sheriff’s badge in stand your ground case

The Rev. Al Sharpton misfired when he suggested Pinellas County Sheriff Bob Gualtieri was influenced by racial considerations when he decided not to arrest Michael Drejka for shooting and killing Markeis McGlockton in a convenience store parking lot ...
Published: 08/06/18