Friday, June 22, 2018
Letters To The Editor

Being a parent, not fathering a child, is what we should celebrate

Being father easy; parenting is tough

In 1972, when President Richard Nixon declared the third Sunday in June as Father's Day, I suspect it was his intent to honor and promote the responsibility of fatherhood. But, sadly, the research indicates it is not working. President Bill Clinton, in 1994, attempted to promote "Parents Day," but it did not catch on. It is unfortunate, because there is a drastic difference between fathers and parents.

In the United States, 41 percent of children — percentages vary by race — are born to unwed mothers. These children have fathers, defined as being fertile and capable of copulation, but lack a parent. These mothers, if they send Father's Day cards, will most likely address them, "To whom it may concern," and research indicates it is concerning fewer and fewer men each year.

Parenting is a conscious decision that you will love, care for, and support one of God's most precious gifts, a child. These 41 percent of our children of unwed mothers, from these so-called fathers, end up as 90 percent of the homeless, 85 percent of the behavioral disorders, 80 percent of the rapists, 75 percent of the high school dropouts, 71 percent of children involved in chemical abuse and 63 percent of the suicides. Because of the fathers responsible for these children, Sunday is a day of mourning.

For those men who are loving, caring and supporting your children, take special pride not in your fatherhood, but your parenthood. Fatherhood is a short-lived, physical act with little or no responsibility. Parenthood is a lifelong commitment, one to which only real men can commit.

Michael G. Rom, Ph.D., Dade City

AP task doesn't sit well with dad | June 9 article

Antiwar message worth fighting for

The article regarding the father's protest of the advanced placement reading assignments evokes two distinct sentiments. First, the father deserves respect and esteem for his service to his country, his commitment to his daughter's education and his apparent love of his country.

Second is the disturbing message that reading anti-war material will damage our AP students and that somehow shame should be involved for "influencing to be anti-war."

We may be able to fill this newspaper with anti-war quotes from great Americans.

George Washington: "My first wish is to see this plague of mankind, war, banished from the earth."

Thomas Jefferson: "I abhor war and view it as the greatest scourge of mankind."

Benjamin Franklin: "There never was a good war or a bad peace."

Dwight D. Eisenhower: "I hate war as only a soldier who has lived it can, only as who has seen its brutality, its futility, its stupidity."

Gen. Omar Bradley: "As far as I am concerned, war itself is immoral."

Ronald Reagan: "History teaches that war begins when governments believe the price of aggression is cheap."

The above quotes present a stronger anti-war message than the lyrics from What's Going On and War.

Given the fact that our beloved country's defense spending is nearly as much as the combined defense spending of the rest of the world, I think that we need to teach a general anti-war message to our youth.

Tom McCarthy, New Port Richey

Avoid write-in ploys; appoint a school chief June 6 editorial

Vote is wrong way to get school chief

Public election of the superintendent is the first step to assure the system will unlikely become increasingly better and the $1.1 billion budget makes it a super-hot political prize. Can you imagine the political influence in hirings, advancements, contract awards, cronyism, etc.?

The leader of a $1.1 billion, 9,000-employee, 67,000-pupil school system ought be by none other than an outstanding educator, i.e. a teacher who rose through the ranks by teaching, working up into school administration, continually educating one's self, holding an Ed.D. or a Ph.D. from a high-caliber university, and possessing a demonstrated track record of proven success in the administration of a large school system. A school system that wants to get better goes out and finds a talented person and hires them away, they don't find them in a public election, and they don't advertise the position for people needing a job.

Parents want a good education for their children and nonparents want taxes held down. A school board elected by the citizens is the party responsible to the taxpayers, who in turn seek out and hire a professional superintendent whom they support. This way presents the best possibility for the best possible education that the taxpayers and county is willing to fund.

Robert A. Zito, Ph.D. New Port Richey

A summer of scientific adventures | June 13 article

Camp is great use of our tax dollars

I am a Pasco County school bus driver and I'm in my third summer of driving for the camp.

As a taxpayer for 40 years, I can say that this program is one of the better ways to spend our tax dollars. Watching young faces light up as they learn is a very good sight.

As one fourth-grader said, if only science could be this much fun the entire school year.

Mark Vavra, Land O'Lakes

Comments

Monday’s letters: College instructors need classes in active shooter training

Active shooter perceptions disproven | June 21We need active shooter trainingThe only guns that I had seen before coming to the United States of America were in glass cases in museums. When I came to America to get a Ph.D. in English at the Unive...
Updated: 3 hours ago

Friday’s letters: What a new Rays ballpark would mean

Rays exec hints at stadium timeline | June 15What a new ballpark would doThe Tampa Bay Rays 2020 organization is working diligently with local business leaders and civic organizations to rally support for the Rays’ new ballpark in Ybor City. The ...
Published: 06/19/18
Updated: 06/22/18

Thursday’s letters: On immigration there has to be a better way

‘Zero tolerance’ ignites outrage | June 20Find better way on immigrationOver the years I’ve voted for candidates from both parties. My observation of the Trump administration’s policy on immigration is not about politics. It has to do with having...
Published: 06/19/18
Updated: 06/21/18

Wednesday’s letters: Charters and traditional public schools each have their place

Public school as public good | Letter, June 17Both kinds of schools can workAs a mother and grandmother of children raised in both traditional public and charter schools in Pinellas County (and a 25-year supporting-services employee for public sc...
Published: 06/18/18
Updated: 06/20/18

Tuesday’s letters: Keep programs that fight AIDS

For author Biden, it’s a father’s gift | June 6Keep programs that fight AIDSAfter former Vice President Joe Biden’s recent visit to St. Petersburg, I noticed an article that he co-wrote with former Sen. Bill Frist. It reminded everyone about the ...
Published: 06/18/18
Updated: 06/19/18

Is anyone watching the money?Hernando County’s budget shortfall is ever changing going from $6 million to $11.5 million to $14 million to what is assumed a final number of $12.6 million. Who knows the budget shortfall could change again.Who’s watchi...
Published: 06/14/18
Updated: 06/18/18

Re: County OKs solar zones | June 8Plea ignored at solar plant hearingThe Pasco County Commission on June 5 voted to identify a utility-sized solar electric plant as a "special exception" use on agricultural-zoned land in Pasco County. What thi...
Published: 06/14/18
Updated: 06/18/18

Monday’s letters: Skip those plastic bags and save the environment

To save our seas, overcome congressional apathy | Column, June 16Do your part and skip plastic bagsEvery day we read about the shame of our landfills and oceans filling up with plastic bags, yet most people don’t care. My wife and I always carry ...
Published: 06/14/18
Updated: 06/18/18

White House defends splitting up families as ‘biblical’ | June 15The suffering of the childrenI am a mother and attorney with more than 20 years of practice living in Tampa. For the past three years, I worked as a magistrate in a Unified Family C...
Published: 06/14/18
Updated: 06/15/18

Saturday’s letters: Community-based care requires community involvement

Fix foster care, and do it quickly | Editorial, June 15Involve the community itselfWhile the detailed article about the scathing state review of Hillsborough County’s foster care problems touched on leadership, a critical point was not addressed....
Published: 06/14/18
Updated: 06/15/18