Your letters

Hernando County School Board ignored good advice

School Board ignored advice

So the School Board has finally seen the light. Two hundred employees is only 6 percent of the total employment of 3,145 as listed in the article. That takes care of the raise and increase in cost of benefits for the remaining employees.

Now get real and face the next year's 2010-11 decrease in property values of 15 percent or more. That comes to another 442 staffers.

Tell us again how the board is going to staff the yet-to-be finished Hexam Road complex financed by the half-cent sales tax? At long last all the board members are proven to be financially inadequate. Now all can see why the intelligent finance officer left.

First, they can't find anyone remotely qualified to work that cheap so they raise the salary. Second, she told them over a year ago about all these shortfalls in cash leading to layoffs.

This board just won't listen to intelligent people and doesn't take care of those learned people financially, either. Enter the on again, off again superintendent scenario and you have a perfect storm of incompetence brewing. No one of authority has any credibility in the whole school system anymore.

Doug Adams, Spring Hill

Dress code should apply to teachers | March 25, letter

Teachers should dress for respect

I applaud this writer for being willing to express his feelings concerning those who call themselves professionals but do not outwardly project that by their appearance in the classroom. If they want to be considered the leader in the classroom and want the students to think of them as professionals, they must exhibit that in their attire.

As was stated, how do you distinguish the teachers from the students in jeans, T-shirts, sweat shirts, shorts and sneakers? Having spent 40 years in public and private education as a teacher and administrator, I am convinced that how a person dresses in the classroom reflects how students relate to them and how they earn the respect they deserve.

It is unfortunate that in our society proper dress has been watered down to the degree that anything goes! There seems to be the feeling that you should dress so you are comfortable regardless of the situation or circumstance. How can we expect our students to dress differently when those standing in front of them look the same or in some cases even more dressed down than those they are teaching?

I am in favor of establishing dress codes for students at all levels. But also let's not forget those who want to be treated as professionals. They too should be required to dress appropriately and project the professional image.

Richard L. Smith, Spring Hill

Trash fees should be by the bag

The county's landfill is filling up, county government wants more money for waste disposal (there is a surprise) and the EPA is all worried about us polluting the world. So we need an answer and we need one soon to stop all of this.

I and others believe the best answer is a pay-as-you-go plan. You have to buy special trash bags that will be used to put your trash in. These are the only bags that will be picked up or accepted at transfer stations and landfills. These bags will not be cheap, a price of $4 to $7, but this price will cover the complete cost of disposing of the trash. All other fees and taxes for garbage disposal will be dropped. You only pay for what you use.

It will not cost more than you pay now, because recycling is free. Everything you recycle will not go to the landfill, can be sold by the county for some income, and is nothing but good for the environment. When I lived in an area that had this plan I cut down my trash to one bag every two weeks.

This type of plan will answer all of the garbage disposal problems that the county is facing today.

Al Williams, Spring Hill

Traffic cameras not about safety

The next time you hear that red-light cameras are put in place to increase public safety, don't believe a word of it. Study after study has shown that when you put cameras above stoplights, rear-end collisions will increase sharply.

Depending on the study, rear-end crashes increased by 33 percent in Oxnard, Calif., 15 percent in Charlotte, N.C., and even more sharply in populations with a high percentage of elderly drivers like Florida. One of the most common studies used to point to the effectiveness of the use of traffic cameras was debunked by our plucky scholars at USF for using fuzzy math, or as they put it, the study "violates many basic principles of sound statistical public health research" and "does not support their conclusion that red-light cameras reduced total or injury crashes". Oops, I guess they're not about public safety at all.

So what are they all about? Replenishing coffers, that's what. Except in the case of Minneapolis, where they had to give back $2.6 million in fines after the Minnesota Supreme Court deemed them unconstitutional because of this pesky little thing called due process. You see, the owner of the vehicle can't be fined if it can't be proven he was behind the wheel. Remember the concept of "innocent until proven guilty"? How long until the Florida Supreme Court follows suit and Brooksville has to return fines that it has already spent?

If it were about public safety, traffic engineers know that increasing the length of the yellow light by 1.4 seconds virtually eliminates red-light running. No increase in ticket revenue there, though.

Scott Ruthford, Spring Hill

Let's stop putting developers first | March 25, letter

We need to elect caring officials

The writer said that Hernando County commissioners should make decisions with the citizens of Hernando County in mind. It will never happen. They are too busy kissing up to developers.

There isn't one of them who cares that there are stores and houses sitting empty all over the place. They care nothing for the ecology of the county. All they care about is filling every square inch of land with a building to sit empty.

Maybe if everyone that really cares about this county bands together we can get people in that care and want what is best for the county.

Shirley Saxton, Brooksville

VA medical care, people are tops

In a recent letter to the editor about the lack of respect toward our flag at the VA, I would like to give a rebuttal regarding the Veterans Administration Clinic in Brooksville and the Veterans Hospital in Tampa.

Granted, as stated in that letter, one person might not have shown sufficient respect for the flag, but that is only a tiny single human incident. It does not reflect on the whole picture of the VA.

I have been getting my medical services from the VA for five years, and it has been outstanding in all aspects. Every single provider, from doctors, assistants, nurses, clerks, information specialist, orderlies, food services and lab techs, has been courteous, knowledgeable and helpful.

These health services are provided to me because I spent three years stateside during the Vietnam era in the U.S. Air Force, 99th Bomb Wing, as an inventory/supply specialist. I am very proud to be an American, equally as proud to have served my country, and I sincerely thank the Veterans Administration and anyone involved with it!

Adona Pearson, Spring Hill

>>your voice counts

We welcome letters from readers for publication. To send a letter from your computer, go to www.tampabay.com/letters and fill in the required information. Type your letter in the space provided on the form, specify that you are writing the Hernando section of the newspaper, and then click "submit." You also may cut and paste a letter that you have prepared elsewhere in your computer.

If you prefer, you may fax your letter to (352) 754-6133, or mail it to: Letters to the Editor, Hernando Times, 15365 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville, FL 34613.

All letters should be brief and must include the writer's name, city of residence, mailing address and telephone number. When possible, letters should include a handwritten signature. Addresses and telephone numbers will not be printed. The Times does not publish anonymous letters.

Letters may be edited for clarity, taste, length and accuracy. We regret that not all letters can be printed.

. your voice counts

We welcome letters from readers for publication. To send a letter from your computer, go to www.tampabay.com/letters and fill in the required information. Type your letter in the space provided on the form, specify that you are writing the Hernando section of the newspaper, and then click "submit." You also may cut and paste a letter that you have prepared elsewhere in your computer.

If you prefer, you may fax your letter to (352) 754-6133, or mail it to: Letters to the Editor, Hernando Times, 15365 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville, FL 34613.

All letters should be brief and must include the writer's name, city of residence, mailing address and telephone number. When possible, letters should include a handwritten signature. Addresses and telephone numbers will not be printed. The Times does not publish anonymous letters.

Letters may be edited for clarity, taste, length and accuracy. We regret that not all letters can be printed.

Hernando County School Board ignored good advice 03/29/09 [Last modified: Sunday, March 29, 2009 7:26pm]

© 2014 Tampa Bay Times

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...