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Letters: Greenlight Pinellas transit plan will solve many problems

Greenlight Pinellas won't help north county letter by John Pringle, June 27

Read plan before Greenlight vote

Dear John Pringle: The Opinion headline in the June 27 North Pinellas and Clearwater Times grabbed my attention because I am a supporter of the Greenlight Pinellas transportation plan. Like you, I have a dream of having the option to hop on a train in North Pinellas and go support the Rays, Buccaneers, Lightning and more with a half-hour train ride. Our shared dream of better transportation is the most important element of our Greenlight Pinellas debate because it leads us to the question, how?

I have trust and confidence in the Greenlight team and their proposal. Are there missing details and could it be better? Of course, but we must understand there is a sequence to a project of this scale. First, a public education and outreach campaign is under way. Second, the Greenlight Pinellas referendum to establish a public funding stream to design, build and operate the transportation network must be successful. Third, the detailed design of schedules, buses, roadway enhancements must be completed. Fourth, build to design. Fifth, operate.

To make an informed vote, I urge you and all Pinellas voters to go to greenlightpinellas.com/. Click on "Read the Plan," read it, at a minimum stare at the transportation network map on page 5 of 20 for two minutes, and objectively ask yourself two questions: "Can I help build this?" and "Would this transportation system improve my quality of life?" If yes, vote Yes; if no, vote No.

For me, it's Yes. I believe Greenlight Pinellas is a solid plan. Is it perfect? Of course not, however there is opportunity to get closer to "perfect" during the engineering phase.

This referendum offers us an opportunity to lead our region and build something very helpful that benefits ourselves, our children and our guests. Frankly, I can't think of a better investment than Greenlight Pinellas. I am ready to pay for it, build it and use it.

Please reconsider your position on Greenlight Pinellas.

Vote yes on the Greenlight Pinellas Plan Nov. 4 because it solves many problems.

Aaron Metz, Palm Harbor

Bell rules are simply unsound | Dan Ruth column, June 20

Bells at the Trop simply obnoxious

I am a baseball fan and I've been to the Trop many times. My wife and I love the game, but we feel the cowbell is an obnoxious way to cheer, and as a senior citizen, I value my hearing.

The last time we went, we sat quietly mainly because our team had not done anything to cause cheers. We cheered the Rays team when they had good plays. We were slapped, pushed and jeered by the Rays fans behind us while they clanked their bells beside our heads and in our ears. Security told us to move for our safety. We did and were told by the fans in that area to get out.

A retired state police officer sat beside us in the first area and said it was his fourth game in a row that weekend and he decided to leave his 10-year-old son home from this "family night" game because of all the rowdies sitting in that area. Since when has the game of baseball and all these bullying tactics been about the fans? How can this be a good example for those who do bring their children? Can't anyone just go to a game and cheer for the team and at the team?

As for the man who lost his ticket, the article indicated his character by printing that he refused to show his ID, was belligerent, and was banned because of his disrespect for everyone involved. Perhaps Dan Ruth should put on a Red Sox shirt and go sit in the stands and see how he is treated before he puts down the visiting fans.

Dick Mikszenas, Clearwater

Time stoplights on Fort Harrison

The stoplights on S Fort Harrison Avenue in Clearwater from a quarter-mile north to a quarter-mile south of the Fort Harrison are not synchronized, resulting in up to 20 to 30 minutes of travel time to go a half-mile during peak traffic periods.

Synchronization of these lights, particularly if they were also in tune with beach traffic flow, would result in considerable savings of time and gasoline for residents and tourists alike. Is this possible?

J.D. Phillips, Seminole

Letters: Greenlight Pinellas transit plan will solve many problems 07/03/14 Letters: Greenlight Pinellas transit plan will solve many problems 07/03/14 [Last modified: Thursday, July 3, 2014 10:33am]

    

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Letters: Greenlight Pinellas transit plan will solve many problems

Greenlight Pinellas won't help north county letter by John Pringle, June 27

Read plan before Greenlight vote

Dear John Pringle: The Opinion headline in the June 27 North Pinellas and Clearwater Times grabbed my attention because I am a supporter of the Greenlight Pinellas transportation plan. Like you, I have a dream of having the option to hop on a train in North Pinellas and go support the Rays, Buccaneers, Lightning and more with a half-hour train ride. Our shared dream of better transportation is the most important element of our Greenlight Pinellas debate because it leads us to the question, how?

I have trust and confidence in the Greenlight team and their proposal. Are there missing details and could it be better? Of course, but we must understand there is a sequence to a project of this scale. First, a public education and outreach campaign is under way. Second, the Greenlight Pinellas referendum to establish a public funding stream to design, build and operate the transportation network must be successful. Third, the detailed design of schedules, buses, roadway enhancements must be completed. Fourth, build to design. Fifth, operate.

To make an informed vote, I urge you and all Pinellas voters to go to greenlightpinellas.com/. Click on "Read the Plan," read it, at a minimum stare at the transportation network map on page 5 of 20 for two minutes, and objectively ask yourself two questions: "Can I help build this?" and "Would this transportation system improve my quality of life?" If yes, vote Yes; if no, vote No.

For me, it's Yes. I believe Greenlight Pinellas is a solid plan. Is it perfect? Of course not, however there is opportunity to get closer to "perfect" during the engineering phase.

This referendum offers us an opportunity to lead our region and build something very helpful that benefits ourselves, our children and our guests. Frankly, I can't think of a better investment than Greenlight Pinellas. I am ready to pay for it, build it and use it.

Please reconsider your position on Greenlight Pinellas.

Vote yes on the Greenlight Pinellas Plan Nov. 4 because it solves many problems.

Aaron Metz, Palm Harbor

Bell rules are simply unsound | Dan Ruth column, June 20

Bells at the Trop simply obnoxious

I am a baseball fan and I've been to the Trop many times. My wife and I love the game, but we feel the cowbell is an obnoxious way to cheer, and as a senior citizen, I value my hearing.

The last time we went, we sat quietly mainly because our team had not done anything to cause cheers. We cheered the Rays team when they had good plays. We were slapped, pushed and jeered by the Rays fans behind us while they clanked their bells beside our heads and in our ears. Security told us to move for our safety. We did and were told by the fans in that area to get out.

A retired state police officer sat beside us in the first area and said it was his fourth game in a row that weekend and he decided to leave his 10-year-old son home from this "family night" game because of all the rowdies sitting in that area. Since when has the game of baseball and all these bullying tactics been about the fans? How can this be a good example for those who do bring their children? Can't anyone just go to a game and cheer for the team and at the team?

As for the man who lost his ticket, the article indicated his character by printing that he refused to show his ID, was belligerent, and was banned because of his disrespect for everyone involved. Perhaps Dan Ruth should put on a Red Sox shirt and go sit in the stands and see how he is treated before he puts down the visiting fans.

Dick Mikszenas, Clearwater

Time stoplights on Fort Harrison

The stoplights on S Fort Harrison Avenue in Clearwater from a quarter-mile north to a quarter-mile south of the Fort Harrison are not synchronized, resulting in up to 20 to 30 minutes of travel time to go a half-mile during peak traffic periods.

Synchronization of these lights, particularly if they were also in tune with beach traffic flow, would result in considerable savings of time and gasoline for residents and tourists alike. Is this possible?

J.D. Phillips, Seminole

Letters: Greenlight Pinellas transit plan will solve many problems 07/03/14 Letters: Greenlight Pinellas transit plan will solve many problems 07/03/14 [Last modified: Thursday, July 3, 2014 10:33am]

    

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