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Letters: Too few have too much influence on Anclote River property

WalMart has decided to end its efforts to construct a supercenter on a parcel of land along the Anclote River.

DOUGLAS R. CLIFFORD | Times

WalMart has decided to end its efforts to construct a supercenter on a parcel of land along the Anclote River.

Walmart selling 74 acres story, Sept. 15

View of few has too much sway

This marks the second time that plans for development of this property have been thwarted by the residents of Sail Harbor, a collection of waterfront homes on the Anclote River that overlooks the property in question.

In the mid 1990s, ABR (now Ceridian) bought this property with plans to build an upscale, multistory office building to house the then-rapidly growing company. The plan was to leave their offices in the abandoned Costco store just south of Tampa Road on U.S. 19 and move to Tarpon Springs.

At the time, the residents of Sail Harbor were quite vocal in their objections and ultimately the project languished. The final blow came when the state Department of Transportation refused to allow a stoplight on U.S. 19 for the project. ABR bought the old Florida Power campus in south St. Petersburg and moved the entire company there.

Granted, the land is environmentally sensitive, but extensive plans have been made both times to deal with that. This new failure along with the failure of Lowes to build on the west side of U.S. 19 despite their already investing $3 million in infrastructure work should be a signal to the voters of Tarpon Springs that something is very wrong with the city's economic development process.

The good of the many should outweigh the vistas of the few.

Rebecca France, Tarpon Springs

Dunedin approves tax increase

Tax rate increase the wrong action

The Dunedin city commissioners voted to increase the tax millage rate for property owners by just over 10 percent. With higher property assessments, the overall increase will be approximately 13 percent.

In the 2014 budget year, 88 percent of the resulting increase in revenue will go to pay for increased salaries, pension benefits and medical benefits of city employees.

We have just experienced our 20th straight month of increased property values in the Tampa Bay area. The average resale value in August alone was 23 percent higher than August of last year. Increased property assessments will soon follow. Revenue will begin to once again flow into government coffers without millage increases.

The commissioners would have better served the community by opting for Plan B: delaying the increase for a year, allowing for input from the citizens advisory Board of Finance and also from the recently hired director of finance.

I applaud Mayor Dave Eggers and Commissioner Julie Bujalski for attempting to hit the pause button. The millage increase was premature at best and most likely unnecessary.

Dave Loeffert, Dunedin

A raise for Tarpon Springs City Manager Mark LeCouris

Let official walk in residents' shoes

He wants a pay raise — so does everyone else. He makes enough money. He doesn't have to struggle in order to pay his property taxes, etc.

He needs to walk in someone else's shoes for a while. He needs to live off a retirement check once a month and to see how far he would make it.

And as for saving money, we the people should vote on letting the Sheriff's Office take over not only the Police Department, but also the probation office.

If anything, property taxes should be lowered in Tarpon Springs.

Charlene Martinez, Tarpon Springs

Red-light cameras

Red-light ticket brings suggestion

I got a ticket for making a left turn on red. I was in a line of cars making the turn.

The camera did show that I was two-tenths of one second in the wrong. I was upset, but I was wrong!

If the light would start to flash before it turns red, it would give you a chance to stop.

Kenneth C. Gregory, Palm Harbor

>>Your voice counts

You may submit a letter to the editor for possible publication through our website at tampabay.com/letters, or by faxing it to (727) 445-4119, or by mailing it to Letters, 1130 Cleveland St., Suite 100A, Clearwater, FL 33755. You must include your name, address and phone number. Letters may be edited for clarity, taste and length.

Letters: Too few have too much influence on Anclote River property 09/17/13 Letters: Too few have too much influence on Anclote River property 09/17/13 [Last modified: Tuesday, September 17, 2013 3:22pm]

    

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Letters: Too few have too much influence on Anclote River property

WalMart has decided to end its efforts to construct a supercenter on a parcel of land along the Anclote River.

DOUGLAS R. CLIFFORD | Times

WalMart has decided to end its efforts to construct a supercenter on a parcel of land along the Anclote River.

Walmart selling 74 acres story, Sept. 15

View of few has too much sway

This marks the second time that plans for development of this property have been thwarted by the residents of Sail Harbor, a collection of waterfront homes on the Anclote River that overlooks the property in question.

In the mid 1990s, ABR (now Ceridian) bought this property with plans to build an upscale, multistory office building to house the then-rapidly growing company. The plan was to leave their offices in the abandoned Costco store just south of Tampa Road on U.S. 19 and move to Tarpon Springs.

At the time, the residents of Sail Harbor were quite vocal in their objections and ultimately the project languished. The final blow came when the state Department of Transportation refused to allow a stoplight on U.S. 19 for the project. ABR bought the old Florida Power campus in south St. Petersburg and moved the entire company there.

Granted, the land is environmentally sensitive, but extensive plans have been made both times to deal with that. This new failure along with the failure of Lowes to build on the west side of U.S. 19 despite their already investing $3 million in infrastructure work should be a signal to the voters of Tarpon Springs that something is very wrong with the city's economic development process.

The good of the many should outweigh the vistas of the few.

Rebecca France, Tarpon Springs

Dunedin approves tax increase

Tax rate increase the wrong action

The Dunedin city commissioners voted to increase the tax millage rate for property owners by just over 10 percent. With higher property assessments, the overall increase will be approximately 13 percent.

In the 2014 budget year, 88 percent of the resulting increase in revenue will go to pay for increased salaries, pension benefits and medical benefits of city employees.

We have just experienced our 20th straight month of increased property values in the Tampa Bay area. The average resale value in August alone was 23 percent higher than August of last year. Increased property assessments will soon follow. Revenue will begin to once again flow into government coffers without millage increases.

The commissioners would have better served the community by opting for Plan B: delaying the increase for a year, allowing for input from the citizens advisory Board of Finance and also from the recently hired director of finance.

I applaud Mayor Dave Eggers and Commissioner Julie Bujalski for attempting to hit the pause button. The millage increase was premature at best and most likely unnecessary.

Dave Loeffert, Dunedin

A raise for Tarpon Springs City Manager Mark LeCouris

Let official walk in residents' shoes

He wants a pay raise — so does everyone else. He makes enough money. He doesn't have to struggle in order to pay his property taxes, etc.

He needs to walk in someone else's shoes for a while. He needs to live off a retirement check once a month and to see how far he would make it.

And as for saving money, we the people should vote on letting the Sheriff's Office take over not only the Police Department, but also the probation office.

If anything, property taxes should be lowered in Tarpon Springs.

Charlene Martinez, Tarpon Springs

Red-light cameras

Red-light ticket brings suggestion

I got a ticket for making a left turn on red. I was in a line of cars making the turn.

The camera did show that I was two-tenths of one second in the wrong. I was upset, but I was wrong!

If the light would start to flash before it turns red, it would give you a chance to stop.

Kenneth C. Gregory, Palm Harbor

>>Your voice counts

You may submit a letter to the editor for possible publication through our website at tampabay.com/letters, or by faxing it to (727) 445-4119, or by mailing it to Letters, 1130 Cleveland St., Suite 100A, Clearwater, FL 33755. You must include your name, address and phone number. Letters may be edited for clarity, taste and length.

Letters: Too few have too much influence on Anclote River property 09/17/13 Letters: Too few have too much influence on Anclote River property 09/17/13 [Last modified: Tuesday, September 17, 2013 3:22pm]

    

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